Death in the Home/Garden (BBC features)

A place to discuss anything retro that isn't games related

Moderators: mknott, NickThorpe, Darran@Retro Gamer, MMohammed, lcarlson

Post Reply
User avatar
Megamixer
Posts: 14888
Joined: Fri Jan 23, 2009 11:18 am
Location: Staffs, UK

Death in the Home/Garden (BBC features)

Post by Megamixer » Sat Nov 05, 2011 5:47 pm

A long shot but does anybody remember these two one-off programmes from around (I think) the early 2000's? They were shown on BBC 1 and basically went through a load of real life accidents that had happened to people in their home and (in a separate follow-up) the garden. Nobody actually died (despite the titles) but some of the accidents were pretty amusing and bizarre. Can't seem to find any record of these shows though and nobody else I mention it to can remember them either.

They featured intereviews and vague reconstructions of what had happened to people.

Anybody else remember these or know if they are watchable on the internet somewhere?
Retro is a state of mind, and cares not for your puny concepts like dates and calendars.

Antonia
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2011 5:01 am

Re: Death in the Home/Garden (BBC features)

Post by Antonia » Thu Dec 08, 2011 11:29 am

A patient lies motionless on an operating table at Yale-New Haven Hospital in Connecticut. His heart is completely still. He’s being kept alive by a heart-lung machine that pumps blood through his body.
“Turn the pump off,” says surgeon John Elefteriades. At that moment, monitors around the theatre flatline. The 50-year-old patient has no pulse and is showing no signs of brain activity. He is dead. Everything is going as Elefteriades planned. On a wall, facing the operating table, are two large digital clocks. One is stopped at 11.25am, the very moment the patient dies, while the other continues to run. Despite the patient’s apparent demise, the surgical team continues to work, completely unphased by what’s just happened. And now the atmosphere is getting decidedly chilly – in a very literal sense. In fact, it’s getting so cold that nurses pull sterile smocks over their scrubs to keep themselves warm as the temperature in the room falls.
The patient’s head is also wrapped in bandages and then covered in ice. By anyone’s standards, deliberately stopping a patient’s circulation as he lies on the operating table is a pretty drastic course of action. But it’s necessary. The patient has an aortic aneurysm. The aorta is the vital vessel that carries blood away from the heart before it moves throughout the body, providing the tissues with oxygen. Usually, it’s the width of a garden hose. In our patient, it’s swelled to the size of a tennis ball. In such a worryingly stretched state, it’s weak and vulnerable. Without treatment, the bulging aorta could burst open at any minute and the patient could die almost instantly.

User avatar
oli_lar
Posts: 4148
Joined: Sun Jun 04, 2006 7:26 pm

Re: Death in the Home/Garden (BBC features)

Post by oli_lar » Thu Dec 08, 2011 11:59 am

They might be on Onthebox or UKNova.

User avatar
greenberet79
Posts: 3350
Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:37 pm
Location: Liverpool

Re: Death in the Home/Garden (BBC features)

Post by greenberet79 » Thu Dec 08, 2011 4:02 pm

Antonia wrote:A patient lies motionless on an operating table at Yale-New Haven Hospital in Connecticut. His heart is completely still. He’s being kept alive by a heart-lung machine that pumps blood through his body.
“Turn the pump off,” says surgeon John Elefteriades. At that moment, monitors around the theatre flatline. The 50-year-old patient has no pulse and is showing no signs of brain activity. He is dead. Everything is going as Elefteriades planned. On a wall, facing the operating table, are two large digital clocks. One is stopped at 11.25am, the very moment the patient dies, while the other continues to run. Despite the patient’s apparent demise, the surgical team continues to work, completely unphased by what’s just happened. And now the atmosphere is getting decidedly chilly – in a very literal sense. In fact, it’s getting so cold that nurses pull sterile smocks over their scrubs to keep themselves warm as the temperature in the room falls.
The patient’s head is also wrapped in bandages and then covered in ice. By anyone’s standards, deliberately stopping a patient’s circulation as he lies on the operating table is a pretty drastic course of action. But it’s necessary. The patient has an aortic aneurysm. The aorta is the vital vessel that carries blood away from the heart before it moves throughout the body, providing the tissues with oxygen. Usually, it’s the width of a garden hose. In our patient, it’s swelled to the size of a tennis ball. In such a worryingly stretched state, it’s weak and vulnerable. Without treatment, the bulging aorta could burst open at any minute and the patient could die almost instantly.
What the deuce?
"Very soon our luck will change, we'll do what we need to do to win matches, and we'll fly."

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests