Which book(s) are you currently reading?

When the other folders just won't do!

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neuromancer
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Post by neuromancer » Tue May 15, 2007 2:47 pm

The Penultimate Ninja wrote:
Tapey297 wrote:Just started One hit wonderland by Tony Hawks (the comic not the skateboarder) enjoyed his two previous books a lot.
I didn't enjoy it as much as Round Ireland with a Fridge or Playing the Moldovans at Tennis, although there were some great moments in it.
I agree with you on that - Round Ireland with a Fridge was really different and funny (and my copy was nicked by someone who must've agreed too) - I haven't been able to finish Playing the Moldovans at Tennis. The magic wasn't there.

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Post by paranoid marvin » Tue May 15, 2007 4:55 pm

Just started Dissolution . I loved historical novels , and this looks to be a good one
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Post by The Penultimate Ninja » Tue May 15, 2007 6:15 pm

paranoid marvin wrote:Just started Dissolution . I loved historical novels , and this looks to be a good one
LOL. Honestly I'm not trying to reply to every post in this thread. I just seem to read a lot. :D

I've read this too and really enjoyed it. It's and interesting period in our history and an interesting central character. I haven't read the other novels featuring Shardlake yet, but I intend to.

The author C J Sansom has recently produced a new book completely unrelated to the setting and characters in the previous 3 (a spy thriller set in the 1940's) which is apparently also very good.

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Post by djcarlos » Tue May 15, 2007 7:32 pm

Just finished the "Dark Knight Returns" four-book series by Frank Miller....flicking through this month's "Uncut" at the mo.
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Post by neuromancer » Tue May 15, 2007 10:42 pm

Sputryk wrote: A Brief History of Time - Stephen Hawking
If you like popular science then you may enjoy these:

E=mc2 'A biography of the World's most famous equation' by David Bodanis
Bodanis tells the story of the equation in terms of the myriad discoveries, from countless philosophers and scientists throughout history, which formed the basis of Einsteins's work. This is a fascinating read, covering an awful lot of ground.

Melyvn Bragg's 'On giant's Shoulders' also covers an array of scientists and their discoveries in a condensed history of science.

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Post by James A » Tue May 15, 2007 10:58 pm

Just finished a book about the battle of Stalingrad and am now reading Let The Galaxy Burn, 39 stories from the Warhammer 40,000 Universe.

I've got a massive pile of books that im trying to work through but as fast as i read them i get more in.

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Post by Smurph » Wed May 16, 2007 7:25 am

I'm not long finished Reaper Man by Pratchett for the umpteenth time, definitely one of his best. I've been meaning to start The Prestige for ages, but apparently its nowhere near as good as the movie (which was admittedly amazing). I may just re-read something else. I re-read a lot, in fact.
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Post by Wildnites » Wed May 16, 2007 10:34 am

Smurph wrote:I'm not long finished Reaper Man by Pratchett for the umpteenth time, definitely one of his best.
That is one of my favourite TP books too, I also have it on tape read by Nigel Planner, he does bring the book alive :)
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Post by neuromancer » Wed May 16, 2007 12:39 pm

Smurph wrote:I'm not long finished Reaper Man by Pratchett for the umpteenth time, definitely one of his best. I've been meaning to start The Prestige for ages, but apparently its nowhere near as good as the movie (which was admittedly amazing). I may just re-read something else. I re-read a lot, in fact.
I've read the Prestige, and personally I think it's superior to the movie in many respects. The style may not suit everybody but I connected with the retro feel of the approach employed; the book's core is written in the diary-entry style of C19th novels primarily in the first person.

Keeping the characters and effects of the film in mind and then enjoying the extra detail afforded by the novel works well for me.

There are also enough differences from the film to justify the book as a separate experience; this is no mere novelisation (the book predates the film by many years). The ending is particularly effective.

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Post by Elgin_McQueen » Wed May 16, 2007 1:11 pm

neuromancer wrote:
Smurph wrote:I'm not long finished Reaper Man by Pratchett for the umpteenth time, definitely one of his best. I've been meaning to start The Prestige for ages, but apparently its nowhere near as good as the movie (which was admittedly amazing). I may just re-read something else. I re-read a lot, in fact.
I've read the Prestige, and personally I think it's superior to the movie in many respects. The style may not suit everybody but I connected with the retro feel of the approach employed; the book's core is written in the diary-entry style of C19th novels primarily in the first person.

Keeping the characters and effects of the film in mind and then enjoying the extra detail afforded by the novel works well for me.

There are also enough differences from the film to justify the book as a separate experience; this is no mere novelisation (the book predates the film by many years). The ending is particularly effective.
I remember looking the differences up on wikipedia after watching the film and it sounded like they'd made some major, but good, changes.
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Post by neuromancer » Wed May 16, 2007 1:25 pm

Elgin_McQueen wrote:
neuromancer wrote:
Smurph wrote:I'm not long finished Reaper Man by Pratchett for the umpteenth time, definitely one of his best. I've been meaning to start The Prestige for ages, but apparently its nowhere near as good as the movie (which was admittedly amazing). I may just re-read something else. I re-read a lot, in fact.
I've read the Prestige, and personally I think it's superior to the movie in many respects. The style may not suit everybody but I connected with the retro feel of the approach employed; the book's core is written in the diary-entry style of C19th novels primarily in the first person.

Keeping the characters and effects of the film in mind and then enjoying the extra detail afforded by the novel works well for me.

There are also enough differences from the film to justify the book as a separate experience; this is no mere novelisation (the book predates the film by many years). The ending is particularly effective.
I remember looking the differences up on wikipedia after watching the film and it sounded like they'd made some major, but good, changes.
It's worth checking the book out IMO

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Post by jimbobmitch » Wed May 16, 2007 1:26 pm

I found Tim Moore's travel writing is also very enjoyable if you like Tony Hawks. French Revolutions was particularly good.
Tim Moore's work is almost always worth a read. French Revolutions, Frost on My Moustache, Continental Drifter (personal favourite) and Do Not Pass Go are all outstanding. :lol: I got about a quarter of the way through Nul Points (on Eurovision) and got bored bored bored. Shame.
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Re: Which book(s) are you currently reading?

Post by neuromancer » Thu Mar 19, 2009 12:26 pm

I just found this thread again whilst using 'manage subscriptions' in the user control panel (first time and there's 4 pages of this stuff!)

It seems the thread died nearly two years ago, but I'll post anyway :D

Currently I'm reading (and dipping in and out of):

On The Edge - the history of Commodore (a good read technically, but a little dry)

Life After God - Douglas Coupland

Finnegan's Wake - James Joyce (I'd not really describe this as 'reading' - I pick this up every couple of years and try and get through a few pages...)

Some dull, dull books on c#

The Ultimate Guide to Videogames (which never seems to cover the title I'm currently interested in)

Trigger Happy - another book about games; interesting approach, generally a more cerebral approach, devoid of introspection and nostalgia.

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Re: Which book(s) are you currently reading?

Post by merman » Thu Mar 19, 2009 12:36 pm

"By Permission of Heaven - the story of the Great Fire of London" by Adrian Tinniswood

It's a part of history I didn't study at school, and this is a fascinating book. There's a lot of background about what was happening just before the fire started, vivid descriptions of the battle to fight the fire, and then the story of how the capital was rebuilt.
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Re: Which book(s) are you currently reading?

Post by neuromancer » Thu Mar 19, 2009 2:35 pm

merman wrote:"By Permission of Heaven - the story of the Great Fire of London" by Adrian Tinniswood

It's a part of history I didn't study at school, and this is a fascinating book. There's a lot of background about what was happening just before the fire started, vivid descriptions of the battle to fight the fire, and then the story of how the capital was rebuilt.
That sounds good, I think I'll track that down.

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