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Re: What Comics did you read as a kid?

Posted: Sat Mar 05, 2011 6:12 pm
by TwoHeadedBoy
I'll read through it in work every so often, but it's off-putting when they have those enormous "free gifts" on the cover. There's one little kid who comes in every week wearing a Sonic T-shirt and he buys the Dandy, the Beano and a packet of GoGo's - it's my past self come back to visit me!

There's always going to be stuff to read though - every time I go to Manchester I come back with another bag full of Busters or something, so it's all alright.

Re: What Comics did you read as a kid?

Posted: Mon Mar 07, 2011 7:15 pm
by Alistair Aitcheson
Sonic the Comic for me. My brother and I bought it from issue 1, right up until the Shanazar storyline (when it was on its last legs - about issue 250 or something?) To be honest, we were way too old for it by the time we stopped reading it, but it still had Richard Elson, and that's what mattered. The best storyline was the Brotherhood of Metallix arc, in my opinion. ;)

My grandma always used to get me an Oor Wullie/The Broons annual for Christmas too. Great stuff 8)

Re: What Comics did you read as a kid?

Posted: Tue Mar 08, 2011 11:53 am
by oldtimer
jackie for me hahahahahaahahah

Re: What Comics did you read as a kid?

Posted: Tue Mar 08, 2011 6:47 pm
by TwoHeadedBoy
Alistair Aitcheson wrote:Sonic the Comic for me. My brother and I bought it from issue 1, right up until the Shanazar storyline (when it was on its last legs - about issue 250 or something?) To be honest, we were way too old for it by the time we stopped reading it, but it still had Richard Elson, and that's what mattered. The best storyline was the Brotherhood of Metallix arc, in my opinion. ;)

My grandma always used to get me an Oor Wullie/The Broons annual for Christmas too. Great stuff 8)
Captain Plunder and Decap Attack had the best stories in Sonic The Comic - and that Metallix one was so good they reprinted the whole thing... twice!

Re: What Comics did you read as a kid?

Posted: Tue Mar 08, 2011 7:23 pm
by Alistair Aitcheson
TwoHeadedBoy wrote:that Metallix one was so good they reprinted the whole thing... twice!
Wow, I didn't know that - that's awesome! :D

Re: What Comics did you read as a kid?

Posted: Tue Mar 08, 2011 8:44 pm
by TwoHeadedBoy
Yeah, it was toward the end of STC's lifeline... First it was reprinted in "Sonic's World" (while they were still doing new Sonic stories), then it was repeated as the "main" Sonic story about a year later. Bit of a rip-off really, but I don't think anyone was still buying the comic by then (and anyone who was probably hadn't been around the first time round).

Re: What Comics did you read as a kid?

Posted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 2:51 am
by Liamh1982
^ My younger brother bought it right up to the end (he is a SERIOUS Sonic nut, makes me look like a hater) but his attempts at looking after comics and mags are poor at best.

Re: What Comics did you read as a kid?

Posted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 5:11 am
by che_don_john
Are those comics worth anything these days? I collected from the first issue right up until about issue 100, and I think they're buried in my mum and dad's loft somewhere. Not really fussed about keeping them so will sell them if it's worth doing so.

Re: What Comics did you read as a kid?

Posted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 6:46 am
by TwoHeadedBoy
Wouldn't say they were worth much. I've seen massive joblots go for around £30-£40, with single issues maxing out at £2.

They're all available in torrents and the like, so they don't really have too much worth. All the "extra-serious" comic collectors who'll pay thousands for a single comic are mostly American as well, and they had their own (crap) version of the Sonic comics...

Re: What Comics did you read as a kid?

Posted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 8:00 am
by themightymartin
The usual ones I guess. Beano, Dandy, Buster and Sonic the Comic. My aunt used to send me Archie Comics from Canada too.

Not actually a comic I know, but did anybody else used to get the Club Nintendo magazines sent to them?

Re: What Comics did you read as a kid?

Posted: Mon Mar 14, 2011 5:25 pm
by felgekarp
I got the first 10 issues of Total Carnage today, anybody know how many issues it ran for?

Re: What Comics did you read as a kid?

Posted: Tue Mar 15, 2011 1:42 pm
by Sixteen Plus
Whilst my brother collected those Marvel superhero and WW2 comicbooks, I was an avid Beano, Dandy, Whizzer & Chips, Nutty reader :lol:

The only comic of his I enjoyed reading though was Spiderman 8)

Re: What Comics did you read as a kid?

Posted: Tue Mar 15, 2011 5:36 pm
by joefish
How far back are we going then? Apologies in advance for length...

The very earliest comic I remember was called Pippin in Playland. Apparently it was a D.C. Thomson title, a merge of two earlier separate comics called Pippin and Playland. This was in the mid 70s and it featured picture/caption stories in the style of the Rupert the Bear stories, based on various book and BBC pre-school characters like Andy Pandy and Barnaby the Bear. The 'Pippin' name is the name of the child (prince of the fairies) being raised by the Pogles in Oliver Postgate's Pogles' Wood. It was partly for pre-school reading, but mostly for parents to read to children like a weekly story-book.

(Those of you going on about King Rollo - and his cat, Hamlet - the comic was a similar, later version of this also including the likes of Pigeon Street and Play School. My younger brother had it. It was a BBC/D.C. Thomson tie-in called Buttons. He later moved on to Transformers).

A little older, we (my elder brother and I) switched to TV Comic. This was another one with weekly strips based on cartoon characters like Barney Bear, Pink Panther and the Inspector from the Pink Panther cartoons. The biggest feature (at the time I was reading it) was a centre full-colour spread of a Battle of the Planets story.

After that, I got Speed from issue 1, with a free plastic toy plane on the cover. That was a fantastic comic, with stories about a stunt rider called Topps on Two Wheels (a thinly disguised Eddie Kidd), Death Wish, about a guy called Blake Edmonds who is disfigured in a crash and takes to wearing a leather mask, and putting himself forward for the most death-defying stunts and adventures, a war story called Baker's Half Dozen and a full-colour sci-fi Lost-in-Space style story called Journey to the Stars. Unfortunately it lasted little more than a year before merging with sports comic Tiger to form Tiger and Speed (which later just reverted to Tiger again). I was gutted that the last issue of Speed never arrived, so I never saw what happened to the stories (in particular Journey to the Stars) that were cut off.

My brother stuck with Tiger and Speed whilst I got stuck into the new Eagle comic (free Space Spinner with issue 1!), with its glossy paper, photo-strip stories and three full colour pages of the brilliant Dan Dare and the Return of the Mekon (based around a younger, blonde great-great-grandson of the original Dan Dare and featuring some great spacecraft and alien designs, like the bounty-hunter walking into a bar with a sodding great shark on an anti-gravity leash).

Later Eagle went over to all-drawn strips, and pulpy cheap paper. It merged with Tiger when that eventually closed down (it was Eagle and Tiger for a while). As for the Scream comic, that never lasted long and that merged with Eagle too. That's how Eagle got to print the likes of The Thirteenth Floor, where the computer (Max) controlling the building (Maxwell Tower) would deliver miscreants in the lift to a non-existent nightmarish 13th-floor of his own creation. Max later became a fictional editor of the Eagle comic, answering readers letters and setting competitions. But Eagle had its own scare stories too. Back in the photo-story days, there was The Collector, a series of twist-ending spooky stories connected by an old man with a collection of mementos from each tale. And later there was The House of Daemon, about newlyweds trapped in their dream-house by a malevolent force, who turned out to be a powerful psychic child from the future. Eagle also ran the short lived Robo-Machines strip, the UK branding of Tonka's Gobots (a kind of smaller, cheaper Transformers, back when all Transformers were the size of the classic Jazz). And it had The Computer Warrior, featuring a kid who played computer games like Gauntlet for real in an attempt to rescue his friend, who was trapped in the computer after failing a similar challenge.

I used to see the likes of The Dandy, The Beano, Cor!!, Buster, Cheeky, Roy of the Rovers, The Topper, Beezer, Warlord, 2000AD and Action (Hook Jaw was awesome) at school - if it rained, and we played in the gym/hall at lunch time, as well as balls and skipping ropes there were a couple of boxes full of old donated comics that came out. I never really appreciated how grown-up and subversive 2000AD could be, but I've got some of the collections of Alan Moore's stories like The Complete Ballad of Halo Jones and they're amazing. There's one of his shorts in a 2000AD annual called Red Planet Blues, where the ABC warriors are sent to assist farmers on Mars because all the humans keep coming back with manic depression. It ends with Hammer-Stein sitting by a grave he's dug for a martian creature, just staring into the sun repeating the line that robots aren't troubled by depression.

I'd also get the likes of the Whizzer & Chips holiday special on summer holidays in Mablethorpe. This was supposedly a merged comic (it really always had been just the one) but it was printed so it could be read half-way-through from the front, and half from the back. There were separate characters and stories, but sometimes the characters and rivalries between the two comics would spill over into combined strips. As well as the black-and-white strips, there was a second colour (orange for the Whizzer half, blue for Chips) used on the cover and some interior pages. Later on I'd be getting Judge Dredd collections instead, but still in Mablethorpe every summer.

None of these are worth much, since it's Americans that go nuts for collecting comics. Old issues of stuff like Speed and Eagle are ridiculously hard to find. The only ones that retain any real value are first editions of popular comics with long histories like The Beano, Dandy, 2000AD, and apparently TV Comic if it features any Dr Who strips.

I also got the first two Starblazer comics, a sci-fi anthology based on the booklet format of the Commando comics. They went on for ages, and I got a load recently, but after the first three or four the stories were really corny. I also picked up from mixed lots a few of Marvel's American Shogun Warrior comics. Pre-Transformers giant-robo toy tie-in stuff. I've since got the full run and they're great for all the awful adverts for stink-bombs and x-ray specs they foisted on American kids.

Eventually we moved on to the likes of Sinclair Programs and Sinclair User, then when Sinclair Programs failed I went on to Your Spectrum (just as it changed to Your Sinclair), Zero, some Edge leading up to the Playstation launch, ST Format, Official Playstation Magazine, Official XBox Magazine, and hey - look - Retro Gamer!

I got the full run of the large Tomb Raider comics that were printed in the UK, and a mixture of the paperback reprints and later US comics to complete the series. I got the UK re-prints of Aliens (that didn't last long) and I have both published issues of the game-based Maximum Overload comic from Dark Horse UK too. Probably the best comic I can recommend to anyone is the complete first series of the late Michael Turner's Fathom. Utterly gorgeous.

And if anyone knows whose @rse to kick to get the complete Dan Dare and the Return of the Mekon reprinted as a trade hardback, get kicking.

Re: What Comics did you read as a kid?

Posted: Sat Mar 19, 2011 7:04 pm
by luzur
Conan the Barbarian, Ghostbusters and Turtles. :)

Re: What Comics did you read as a kid?

Posted: Mon Apr 25, 2011 5:03 pm
by TwoHeadedBoy
Just read through three issues of Electric Soup, a Scottish Viz-alike from the early Nineties which is shockingly good. Frank Quietly's artwork is wonderful, this is one comic I'd recommend to... Most people. There's a strip in there called The Wilderbeestes which is one of the funniest things I've ever read.