RG forum's 100 great retro games—as chosen by YOU!

Discuss and discover all the great games of yesteryear!

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merman
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Post by merman » Thu Mar 30, 2006 10:04 am

CraigGrannell wrote:Judging by the original Zzap! review, the C64 version also had split-screen.
Yep, Ashley Bennett performed a miracle with the C64 version, keeping up the speed and keeping the number of opponents up. Gremlin's publicity for the game was good as well...
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craigritchie
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Post by craigritchie » Thu Mar 30, 2006 12:22 pm

I got to go for:

37. Star Control II (PC)

Note: perhaps we should mention the 3DO version as well..?

This game was just awesome. Huge, engrossing, beautiful. A deep, well written plot, a true persistent world (events taking place after a certain amount of time has passed, for example, irrespective of the player's actions) and a real sense of urgency to what you were doing. So much space to explore, numerous ways to customise your ship, moral dilemmas (would you trade crewmembers as slaves for better technology?) and all of this with a combat system so fun it was playable as a stand alone Melee option. This game was excellent, and I played it through in 1994, and then again in 2004 thanks to the Ur-Quan Masters remake available from Sourceforge. A true classic, and a shining example of combining genres and subgames into a perfect, flowing whole.

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markopoloman
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Post by markopoloman » Thu Mar 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Star Control II was bloody excellent - well worth a place in the TOP 100 :)

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forestville
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Post by forestville » Fri Mar 31, 2006 4:26 am

#36 super mario world (snes)

this game was and still is a very cool 8) game, the graphics and game play are top notch, all levels are layed out very well with some levels having two or more exits, lots of secrets to find, good sound fx, to this day super mario world is still the best mario game.

8) 8) 8) 8)
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EnglishRob
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Post by EnglishRob » Fri Mar 31, 2006 4:31 am

forestville wrote:#36 super mario world (snes)

this game was and still is a very cool 8) game, the graphics and game play are top notch, all levels are layed out very well with some levels having two or more exits, lots of secrets to find, good sound fx, to this day super mario world is still the best mario game.

8) 8) 8) 8)
Definately!

I've been playing it on the GBA and it still plays as well as when I first got it. My girlfriends daughter was playing it the other day. She was on the first castle (Iggy's Castle) and she was just about to get squished. I said "you're gonna die now" and she said "no I'm not" then she got squashed.

I then kindly explained that I was playing that game before she was even born, and I've spent far too many hours playing it.

Rob
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Jazzem
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Post by Jazzem » Fri Mar 31, 2006 5:26 am

Yeah, SMW is fantastic, best 2D platformer in my book. I could just spend hours playing through those levels.

But Yoshi's Island too! That had better make it. *Hums forest theme*

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Post by witchfinder » Fri Mar 31, 2006 10:09 am

This is my first post, so I may as well make it a worthwhile one... :)

A couple of my faves have already been chosen but since nobody has added a BBC Micro game to the list yet...

#35 Chuckie Egg (BBC Micro)

One of the all-time classic platform games, the graphics and sound are pretty mediocre, even by the standards set in the early 80s, but the game is so enjoyable to play. Once you get to grips with the way the player interacts with the scenery, you can become a blur of perpetual motion that slides down ladders and rebounds of the edge of platforms to reach the eggs and avoid danger. A simple premise, great playability and that little bit of uniqueness make this a perfect example of why retro games are as popular now as they ever were... And it was my dad's favourite game too!

mosh
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Post by mosh » Sat Apr 01, 2006 9:24 pm

#34. Jack Attack - Commodore C16/+4

Released on cart by Commodore, also came out for the C64. Different kind of platformer, where the emphasis is on landing on all the available platforms for extra points and squashing the balloon heads, while not drowning, being squashed by the balloon heads, or crushed by falling blocks. Deceptively hard game, I still haven't successfully completed the game on the C16. C16 version is better than the C64 version because the C16 version is faster, and it showcases the wonderful colours the C16 was capable of. Nowhere near being technically the greatest thing the C16 could do, but tons of fun and easy to start playing without a steep learning curve.

PC remake by the original writers isn't bad either, at http://www.jackattack2.com

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Post by Elgin_McQueen » Sat Apr 01, 2006 10:02 pm

craigritchie wrote:I got to go for:

37. Star Control II (PC)

Note: perhaps we should mention the 3DO version as well..?

This game was just awesome. Huge, engrossing, beautiful. A deep, well written plot, a true persistent world (events taking place after a certain amount of time has passed, for example, irrespective of the player's actions) and a real sense of urgency to what you were doing. So much space to explore, numerous ways to customise your ship, moral dilemmas (would you trade crewmembers as slaves for better technology?) and all of this with a combat system so fun it was playable as a stand alone Melee option. This game was excellent, and I played it through in 1994, and then again in 2004 thanks to the Ur-Quan Masters remake available from Sourceforge. A true classic, and a shining example of combining genres and subgames into a perfect, flowing whole.



As soon as I saw this I thought, hmmm, Ur-Quan Masters, I recognise that, pulled out the Retro Gamer disc and have now played it for the first time ever. Excellent game!!! Still need to suss out all the controls and the like and figure out why things happen the way they do and what everything means but so far this is excellent and going to give me some very, very, late nights indeed.
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Post by preownedgames.co.uk » Sun Apr 02, 2006 3:52 pm

This may be a dull/obvious answer but why has nobody picked Zelda:OOT or Mario 64 , the two best games ever made ?

Anyway, I wouldn't be that obvious either so i'm going to pick...

33 - Historyline - Amiga

Because it's the only game which i've ever played for 12 hours straight on the same level without getting bored.

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Ash
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Post by Ash » Mon Apr 03, 2006 5:45 pm

This thread was mentioned on the March edition of RGR. 8)

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RobinElvin
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Post by RobinElvin » Tue Apr 04, 2006 6:44 am

32 Carrier Command (Amiga)

This game was just the business (and still is) The first thing which impressed was the solid 3D - smooth as silk. This is the kind of game we needed the 16-bits for. You get strategy and action in the same game. Lots of toys to play with (Manta aircraft, Walrus landing craft, the carrier itself)

Loads of atmosphere: I was always nervous sending my poor Walrus to virus bomb an enemy island. And also when I put a long-range comms pod in a Manta and left it behind on a key island, just waiting for the enemy carrier to turn up.

I really could go on and on about this one. Anyway, if you've played it you'll know what I'm talking about. If not then go and play it!!

P.S. What on earth were they thinking with the C64 version?!?
Rob

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CraigGrannell
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Post by CraigGrannell » Tue Apr 04, 2006 7:57 am

RobinElvin wrote:P.S. What on earth were they thinking with the C64 version?!?
They were thinking: "Oh bugger. We forgot the C64 is really s—— at 3D. Hey! Let's do a rubbish 2D version of the game instead!"
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Post by bolda » Tue Apr 04, 2006 8:32 am

31 Frontier : Elite II (Amiga/ST)

A worthy follow up to the classic Elite. Yes, the graphics did chug along and the combat was difficult but the sheer scale of the game was mind-blowing. The fact that you could visit literally hundreds of unique planets and space stations in real-time/real-space, all with accurate astronomical modelling, and it ran from a single disk on a 0.5MB machine with no in-game loading is a triumph of programming!

I've played many modern space-opera games on PC (X2:The Threat, Tachyon:The Fringe, Freelancer, Starlancer...) but nothing comes close to generating the same genuine feeling of human space exploration. It's probably the most believable vision of the distant future in a game.
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Post by seanmcmanus » Tue Apr 04, 2006 8:42 am

30. Get Dexter (Amstrad CPC)

This was a game that took the isometric 3D format and made it a truly playable game. It was fast, the graphics were colourful, the rooms felt real and didn't feel like the map was drawn on graph paper, and the game had a great sense of humour. You would bounce on the beds to reach things high up, get chopped up if you walked into a ceiling fan, tumble off office chairs as they spun underneath you. The game had arcade elements (monsters were rampant and homed in on you, you could kill monsters and recharge energy) and puzzle elements (finding keys for doors, bringing the passes and scientists together to unlock the code, working out what killed each monster). It was inspired by Knight Lore and Batman but better in nearly every way - and I do have a lot of affection for those two games. Certainly one of the greatest games on the CPC, and one of the finest games on an 8-bit computer that I've seen.

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