The 80's arcade crash

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ncf1
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The 80's arcade crash

Post by ncf1 » Wed Jul 19, 2017 11:55 pm

I was just watching Chasing Ghosts again and realised the crash they mentioned that occurred throughout 1983/1984 didn't happen here (Australia) at all, in fact arcades flourished and more and more popped up, until around the advent of the PlayStation. Now my question is, was the arcade crash limited to the US? Did it happen at all in the UK? And actually why did it happen at all? Chasing Ghosts doesn't really give an answer, or maybe I missed it. Because games were just become more interesting, more exciting, rapidly improved technically, so why was there the very sudden closing down of arcades, did it stem from Atari? But as I said, I didn't see anything like that at all here.. arcades just got bigger and brighter, and there were more of them.

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Re: The 80's arcade crash

Post by The Laird » Thu Jul 20, 2017 4:11 am

ncf1 wrote:
Wed Jul 19, 2017 11:55 pm
I was just watching Chasing Ghosts again and realised the crash they mentioned that occurred throughout 1983/1984 didn't happen here (Australia) at all, in fact arcades flourished and more and more popped up, until around the advent of the PlayStation. Now my question is, was the arcade crash limited to the US? Did it happen at all in the UK? And actually why did it happen at all? Chasing Ghosts doesn't really give an answer, or maybe I missed it. Because games were just become more interesting, more exciting, rapidly improved technically, so why was there the very sudden closing down of arcades, did it stem from Atari? But as I said, I didn't see anything like that at all here.. arcades just got bigger and brighter, and there were more of them.
It was strictly a US thing, although it's amazing how many people thing it was a worldwide thing due to revisionist history and the arrogance of Americans calling it a "Worldwide crash"

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Re: The 80's arcade crash

Post by Mayhem » Thu Jul 20, 2017 8:40 am

The home videogame crash did have an influence in the US towards the arcades there. If you look at KLOV for 1983, 1984 and 1985, then the number of machines released doesn't seem to change much, just more of them then directly come from Japan instead.
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Re: The 80's arcade crash

Post by ncf1 » Thu Jul 20, 2017 11:18 am

The Laird wrote:
Thu Jul 20, 2017 4:11 am
ncf1 wrote:
Wed Jul 19, 2017 11:55 pm
I was just watching Chasing Ghosts again and realised the crash they mentioned that occurred throughout 1983/1984 didn't happen here (Australia) at all, in fact arcades flourished and more and more popped up, until around the advent of the PlayStation. Now my question is, was the arcade crash limited to the US? Did it happen at all in the UK? And actually why did it happen at all? Chasing Ghosts doesn't really give an answer, or maybe I missed it. Because games were just become more interesting, more exciting, rapidly improved technically, so why was there the very sudden closing down of arcades, did it stem from Atari? But as I said, I didn't see anything like that at all here.. arcades just got bigger and brighter, and there were more of them.
It was strictly a US thing, although it's amazing how many people thing it was a worldwide thing due to revisionist history and the arrogance of Americans calling it a "Worldwide crash"
Cheers Laird, yes I did hate when they always did that, as if the rest of the world didn't exist, but hopefully since the advent of the internet it has tempered things a bit. :D

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Re: The 80's arcade crash

Post by ncf1 » Thu Jul 20, 2017 11:27 am

Mayhem wrote:
Thu Jul 20, 2017 8:40 am
The home videogame crash did have an influence in the US towards the arcades there. If you look at KLOV for 1983, 1984 and 1985, then the number of machines released doesn't seem to change much, just more of them then directly come from Japan instead.
Thanks for the info Mayhem, so the home videogame crash did have an effect. I sill find the sudden, violent mass exodus remarkable and baffling though because arcades were such an institution here that just grew and grew, I mean arcades shut down there in '83/'84 at the time when things were just getting started.. I still don't quite understand it. I mean did they all share the same brain cell there or what, how can something so addicting, so alluring and in its infancy and indeed just taking off suddenly be abandoned, at one might arguably say the very best time.. I just still don't get it.

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Re: The 80's arcade crash

Post by The Laird » Thu Jul 20, 2017 11:47 am

ncf1 wrote:
Thu Jul 20, 2017 11:27 am
Mayhem wrote:
Thu Jul 20, 2017 8:40 am
The home videogame crash did have an influence in the US towards the arcades there. If you look at KLOV for 1983, 1984 and 1985, then the number of machines released doesn't seem to change much, just more of them then directly come from Japan instead.
Thanks for the info Mayhem, so the home videogame crash did have an effect. I sill find the sudden, violent mass exodus remarkable and baffling though because arcades were such an institution here that just grew and grew, I mean arcades shut down there in '83/'84 at the time when things were just getting started.. I still don't quite understand it. I mean did they all share the same brain cell there or what, how can something so addicting, so alluring and in its infancy and indeed just taking off suddenly be abandoned, at one might arguably say the very best time.. I just still don't get it.
Yes but while the production of US arcades slowed down and many manufacturers just disappeared the production of Japanese games sped up and lots of new companies from that part of the world sprung up. Which is why we noticed very little difference over here.

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Re: The 80's arcade crash

Post by outdated_gamer » Thu Jul 20, 2017 1:20 pm

ncf1 wrote:
Thu Jul 20, 2017 11:18 am
The Laird wrote:
Thu Jul 20, 2017 4:11 am
ncf1 wrote:
Wed Jul 19, 2017 11:55 pm
I was just watching Chasing Ghosts again and realised the crash they mentioned that occurred throughout 1983/1984 didn't happen here (Australia) at all, in fact arcades flourished and more and more popped up, until around the advent of the PlayStation. Now my question is, was the arcade crash limited to the US? Did it happen at all in the UK? And actually why did it happen at all? Chasing Ghosts doesn't really give an answer, or maybe I missed it. Because games were just become more interesting, more exciting, rapidly improved technically, so why was there the very sudden closing down of arcades, did it stem from Atari? But as I said, I didn't see anything like that at all here.. arcades just got bigger and brighter, and there were more of them.
It was strictly a US thing, although it's amazing how many people thing it was a worldwide thing due to revisionist history and the arrogance of Americans calling it a "Worldwide crash"
Cheers Laird, yes I did hate when they always did that, as if the rest of the world didn't exist, but hopefully since the advent of the internet it has tempered things a bit. :D
We have to take into account that 80s American and European (no idea about Australian :wink: ) gaming was different in that Americans were more console-centric while Europeans were more computer-centric, so the decline of interest into video gaming in the US was not really felt elsewhere. It did give emerging Japanese companies the spot light though, especially to Nintendo and their NES, but also to NEC and Sega. Interestingly, the NES apparently wasn't very successful in Europe, although hardware clones were quite popular in the early 90s in many Euro countries (and also former Eastern Bloc ones). Afaik Arcades started to decline around the time the Sega Dreamcast and PS2 came out, but they were really big in the 80s and early to mid 90s. It had to do with the fact that Arcade-level games were available on the consoles, but also a change of taste as players wanted more "complex" games too.

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Re: The 80's arcade crash

Post by mrmessy » Thu Jul 20, 2017 2:01 pm

I think the "Worldwide Video Game Crash" is rather like "World Series Baseball", in that no-one outside the USA had anything to do with it. Except for Canada, perhaps.

It seems that it is only in recent years that the USA media has realised the rest of the world actually exists.
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Re: The 80's arcade crash

Post by mrmessy » Thu Jul 20, 2017 2:10 pm

It is also quite annoying when an American person produces some sort of "Complete History of Video Games" and spends half of it banging on about the NES (not popular in Europe), but barely mentions 8bit and 16bit home computers (VERY popular in Europe).
'79:Micro5500> '83:Spec(48K)> '84:Spec+(kit)> '86:Spec128> '88:ST> '90:A500> '93:A1200> '93:SNES> '95:PS1> '99:PC> '02:PS2> '05:Xbox> '12:X360> '14:PS4... XboxLive:messy73, PSN:mrmessy73, YouTube:mrmessyschannel

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Re: The 80's arcade crash

Post by ncf1 » Thu Jul 20, 2017 3:30 pm

Thanks guys for your responses. Now at least I know I'm not mad wondering why I missed out on this supposed worldwide crash. :D

I don't see it as much anymore but the US still likes to do things like brand MMA as "UFC".. I couldn't believe Yahoo for some years in the sports section had football.. cricket.. tennis.. UFC... I couldn't believe it, they've had vale tudo and MMA events worldwide for almost 100 years and suddenly its "UFC"? Its like calling every hamburger a McDonalds. Buut anyway. Who cares. :o They'll learn, one day.

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Re: The 80's arcade crash

Post by SpecChum81 » Thu Jul 20, 2017 6:32 pm

I didn't really start gaming until 1986 when I was 5, so thankfully it wouldn't have affected me anyway...
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Re: The 80's arcade crash

Post by paranoid marvin » Fri Jul 21, 2017 2:53 am

The main effect of the 'crash' in the uk was that it saw the beginning of the end of the VCS (and some incredibly cheap carts) and the emergence of 8 bit computers.
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Re: The 80's arcade crash

Post by ncf1 » Fri Jul 21, 2017 2:41 pm

outdated_gamer wrote:
Thu Jul 20, 2017 1:20 pm
ncf1 wrote:
Thu Jul 20, 2017 11:18 am
The Laird wrote:
Thu Jul 20, 2017 4:11 am


It was strictly a US thing, although it's amazing how many people thing it was a worldwide thing due to revisionist history and the arrogance of Americans calling it a "Worldwide crash"
Cheers Laird, yes I did hate when they always did that, as if the rest of the world didn't exist, but hopefully since the advent of the internet it has tempered things a bit. :D
We have to take into account that 80s American and European (no idea about Australian :wink: ) gaming was different in that Americans were more console-centric while Europeans were more computer-centric, so the decline of interest into video gaming in the US was not really felt elsewhere. It did give emerging Japanese companies the spot light though, especially to Nintendo and their NES, but also to NEC and Sega. Interestingly, the NES apparently wasn't very successful in Europe, although hardware clones were quite popular in the early 90s in many Euro countries (and also former Eastern Bloc ones). Afaik Arcades started to decline around the time the Sega Dreamcast and PS2 came out, but they were really big in the 80s and early to mid 90s. It had to do with the fact that Arcade-level games were available on the consoles, but also a change of taste as players wanted more "complex" games too.
Here it was definitely more computer-centric, and arcades were like a separate entity, and one never affected the other (until the PS1 arrived).
In fact as computer and consoles came and went the arcades seemed to steadily grow and flourish, until, if I had to pinpoint it, kids said 'hey, I can play Tekken on my PlayStation, I don't need to go to the arcade anymore!'. Then arcades started to have more sideshow type games, tried to be more 'family oriented' and that lasted for a few years before fizzling out.

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Re: The 80's arcade crash

Post by kiwimike » Fri Jul 21, 2017 9:21 pm

The Laird wrote:
Thu Jul 20, 2017 4:11 am
ncf1 wrote:
Wed Jul 19, 2017 11:55 pm
I was just watching Chasing Ghosts again and realised the crash they mentioned that occurred throughout 1983/1984 didn't happen here (Australia) at all, in fact arcades flourished and more and more popped up, until around the advent of the PlayStation. Now my question is, was the arcade crash limited to the US? Did it happen at all in the UK? And actually why did it happen at all? Chasing Ghosts doesn't really give an answer, or maybe I missed it. Because games were just become more interesting, more exciting, rapidly improved technically, so why was there the very sudden closing down of arcades, did it stem from Atari? But as I said, I didn't see anything like that at all here.. arcades just got bigger and brighter, and there were more of them.
It was strictly a US thing, although it's amazing how many people thing it was a worldwide thing due to revisionist history and the arrogance of Americans calling it a "Worldwide crash"
Their baseball is 'World Series' too though :wink:

Yeah, we never felt the impact in NZ at all, except some of our US publications stopped turning up. Here it was business as usual, and ticked along, the Sega machines (Nintendo wasn't big in NZ at that time all that much in comparison) just taking over seamlessly from the previous gen which kept going without hitch. Of course, our market was a mix- US, UK, and Hong Kong clones all intermixed. Arcades still ticked along until the 90s when home games pretty much made them redundant sadly.

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Re: The 80's arcade crash

Post by kiwimike » Fri Jul 21, 2017 9:24 pm

mrmessy wrote:
Thu Jul 20, 2017 2:01 pm
I think the "Worldwide Video Game Crash" is rather like "World Series Baseball", in that no-one outside the USA had anything to do with it. Except for Canada, perhaps.

It seems that it is only in recent years that the USA media has realised the rest of the world actually exists.
Only cos Trump is fecking them off :lol:

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