Games that pushed hardware limits

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HalcyonDaze00
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Re: Games that pushed hardware limits

Post by HalcyonDaze00 » Sat Nov 12, 2016 5:30 am

good grief! I hope that's a copy and paste from somewhere.

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Re: Games that pushed hardware limits

Post by aztecca » Sat Nov 12, 2016 5:40 am

Street alpha 2 on the snes.
Half life 2 on xbox
Gta v on xbox 360
Shadow of the colossus on ps2.
Super mario bros 3 on the Nes
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sebadude
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Re: Games that pushed hardware limits

Post by sebadude » Sat Nov 12, 2016 5:56 am

Hello folks,
we have a great thread on this here: http://www.retrogamer.net/forum/viewtop ... =2&t=22911

Plus the Game Sack guys on YouTube did three really interesting videos on this very subject! :)

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Re: Games that pushed hardware limits

Post by Katzkatz » Mon Nov 14, 2016 10:39 am

A couple on the C64 :-

First Samurai. Quite an impressive conversion of this game to an 8 bit machine.

Myth. Another impressive conversion of an 16 bit game to the old breadbin. The cartridge version seems even better.

On the Amiga :-

Geoff Grammond's Formula 1 Grand Prix :-

Impressive simulation for its time. Really pushed an A500 with 1 Meg of RAM hard.

Shadow of the Beast. Rubbish game - but the parallax scrolling was impressive. It utilitised the Amiga's hardware at the time.

First Samurai. This version of the game is quite impressive, because level 9 has 3 ways parallax scrolling. No other version has that(including the SNES and DOS PC).

Spectrum :-

Robocop. Impressive conversion for an 8 bit machine.

Where Time Stood Still. Yes, you needed a 128 Kb machine to run it, but it was an impressive isometric adventure on this machine. Although, it's in monochrome, the visuals and scrolling are very impressive.

The Great Escape. From the same team who did "Where Time Stood Still.". Another impressive isometric adventure.

Night Raider. Always thought that was quite an impressive flight simulator for the Spectrum.


DOS PC :-

Quake. The use of 3D models for the characters was a step forward in graphics.

X-Wing or Tie Fighter. Pushed the 386 machines pretty hard, so you probably needed a 486 at least. Really impressive for its time, and got a lot of people into PC gaming. I'd say Tie Fighter was more impressive because it could use the Soundblaster AWE 32 and Gravis Ultrasound for surround type sound, and also because it had Gouraud shading for the graphics.

EF2000. For the amazing landscapes. They looked liked something that you used to use Vista(the 3D landscape generating programming not Microsoft's rubbish operating system) to generate. Really realistic.

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joefish
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Re: Games that pushed hardware limits

Post by joefish » Mon Nov 14, 2016 11:12 am

Forcing you to buy a new graphics card to play a game is not 'pushing hardware limits'. It's going right over the limit to the point where it doesn't work any more, hence the need to buy a new graphics card.

Having Wolfenstein do fast texture mapping on a 386 is clever. Telling you "tough nuts, you'll have to buy new hardware to run this next one" is bone-idle developers taking the easy route.

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Re: Games that pushed hardware limits

Post by Antiriad2097 » Mon Nov 14, 2016 1:46 pm

Wasn't Myth a C64 game first?
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Re: Games that pushed hardware limits

Post by Mayhem » Mon Nov 14, 2016 2:31 pm

Solaris (Atari 2600) - Incredible looking mid 80s release by the author of Star Raiders.
Boulderdash (Atari 2600) - Seriously, just getting the game to run on the hardware was difficult enough, but to make it playable too? Amazing.
Turrican 1/2 (C64) - Manfrez Trenz is a fricking programming legend.
Protector (Vectrex) - No one really believed this was possible when the first video came out in 2003, until we purchased the game and found it was real...
Antiriad2097 wrote:Wasn't Myth a C64 game first?
It was, it was out on the 8 bits first, and then converted to the Amiga/ST, where the storyline changed a bit along with the protagonist. In fact, it's the 16 bit artwork used on the C64 cartridge release afaik.
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ncf1
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Re: Games that pushed hardware limits

Post by ncf1 » Mon Nov 14, 2016 4:49 pm

Karateka, and Beyond Castle Wolfenstein on the Apple II. You felt you were playing something superlative, something almost beyond what the system was capable of.

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outdated_gamer
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Re: Games that pushed hardware limits

Post by outdated_gamer » Mon Nov 14, 2016 5:54 pm

joefish wrote:Forcing you to buy a new graphics card to play a game is not 'pushing hardware limits'. It's going right over the limit to the point where it doesn't work any more, hence the need to buy a new graphics card.

Having Wolfenstein do fast texture mapping on a 386 is clever. Telling you "tough nuts, you'll have to buy new hardware to run this next one" is bone-idle developers taking the easy route.
Well that was always the case with PC gaming - every time a new demanding game comes out people are compelled to upgrade. It's certainly a different approach to console gaming where every bit of power is being squeezed out of them. Then again, you have individuals who try to run PC games on insufficient hardware, sometimes to interesting results. Here's some Quake 3 on dual Pentium Pros (Pentium 1 for servers) and here's some on a SGI Irix Workstation.


p.s.: Wolf3D runs well on a 286 too btw. Here a vid:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Gvz6PMtEuU

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Re: Games that pushed hardware limits

Post by paranoid marvin » Wed Nov 16, 2016 10:42 pm

Carrier Command on the 128k Spectrum - how was this even possible?


Defender of the Crown on C64 - better in every way than the Amiga original

Labyrinth (Activision) on C64 - the cinema brought to the humble breadbin. Looked and sounded jaw-dropping

Quake with 3dfx card - although it required a peripheral,it still pushed the Pc to the maximum of its capabilities and made it produce a game that played like nothing seen before.

3d Monster Maze on the Zx81
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Re: Games that pushed hardware limits

Post by kiwimike » Thu Nov 17, 2016 12:31 am

Fantastic idea for a mag feature. I think any games near the end of a long running system (Atari VCS, Spectrum, PS1 etc) have many excellent examples of the machine being stretched to it's limits. The VCS in particular, it was incredible what was being squeezed out of that machine when it was quite dated even early on :)

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retroman83
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Re: Games that pushed hardware limits

Post by retroman83 » Thu Nov 17, 2016 4:32 am

Was thinking about this driving home last night and came up with the following...


SNES - Stunt Race FX.

N64 - Donkey Kong 64 (any N64 game that REQUIRED the memory expansion).

PS1 - Final Fantasy 8.

PS2 - Shadow of the Colossus.



Now I don't know if I'm right or wrong, but this is just what comes to mind for me.

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Megamixer
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Re: Games that pushed hardware limits

Post by Megamixer » Thu Nov 17, 2016 1:45 pm

retroman83 wrote:PS2 - Shadow of the Colossus.
Would agree with this as I'm pretty sure the PS2 struggled to deal with it frame rate-wise.
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outdated_gamer
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Re: Games that pushed hardware limits

Post by outdated_gamer » Thu Nov 17, 2016 9:35 pm

paranoid marvin wrote: Defender of the Crown on C64 - better in every way than the Amiga original
Not in terms of graphics and sound. :wink:

I don't know about gameplay but I'd agree that many games felt better on C=64 compared to the Amiga versions, despite technically worse graphics and sound. I guess the developers targeted the more popular platform which was the C=64.

Quake didn't require a 3D accelerator btw, it didn't even support any 3D accelerators when it came out. That was added months later in the form of patches like GLQuake. It was the difference in speed and visual quality that the hardware accelerated version offered that made people buy a 3D card for it.

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Matt_B
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Re: Games that pushed hardware limits

Post by Matt_B » Thu Nov 17, 2016 10:18 pm

Yeah, I remember first playing Quake on a 90MHz Pentium with software rendering, and it ran OK. You could get a playable frame rate at 320x200, even if it wasn't half as slick as Descent, but higher resolutions were pretty much off limits. A couple of years later, with an ATI Rage card, and it'd do 1280x1024 without a problem though, and that seemed pretty revelatory at the time.

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