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Re: The twilight years of your favourite magazine

Posted: Mon Dec 14, 2015 2:10 pm
by Negative Creep
Shinobi wrote:For me it was Commodore User when they stopped reviewing Commodore 16 games around 1987 even saying they would continue to support it, if games where released(which they where)

Mean Machines when it went to NMS and Mean Machines Sega still have all 24 issue's of Mean Machines and every Mean Machine Sega, MMS was very poor compared to the brilliance of Mean Machines and they lost Jazza..

Super Play went wafer thin they hardly reviewed any games and had unknown people reviewing them, gave up on issue 45 recently discovered there was 2 more issue's I never knew existed

Super Play issues 46 and 47 were 80 pages compared to about 96 for the earlier ones, so not bad really. Quality of the reviews stayed high until the end as well

Re: The twilight years of your favourite magazine

Posted: Mon Dec 14, 2015 2:53 pm
by Shinobi
Negative Creep wrote:
Shinobi wrote:For me it was Commodore User when they stopped reviewing Commodore 16 games around 1987 even saying they would continue to support it, if games where released(which they where)

Mean Machines when it went to NMS and Mean Machines Sega still have all 24 issue's of Mean Machines and every Mean Machine Sega, MMS was very poor compared to the brilliance of Mean Machines and they lost Jazza..

Super Play went wafer thin they hardly reviewed any games and had unknown people reviewing them, gave up on issue 45 recently discovered there was 2 more issue's I never knew existed

Super Play issues 46 and 47 were 80 pages compared to about 96 for the earlier ones, so not bad really. Quality of the reviews stayed high until the end as well
I've never saw those 2 issues in the wild I only knew about there existence recently as Confused showed me pictures of them.. One cover showed the N64 so I imagine it was a Snes and N64 Magazine I remember a friend telling me Super Play was merging with Total

Re: The twilight years of your favourite magazine

Posted: Mon Dec 14, 2015 3:23 pm
by Negative Creep
The two I own are the same ones I bought when they were new, never realised they were rare until you mentioned it! Issue 46 has the N64 logo in space, a big old feature of the upcoming launch and 20+ games, a feature on SNES fighters but only 3 reviews (although I'm guessing releases were starting to dry up by that point). 47 has Mario in the Pilotwings hang glider, Mario 64 review (97%), a feature on SNES platformers, 4 reviews and a list of their worst games ever (Pitfighter was number 1). Was gutted when I found out it was shutting down

Re: The twilight years of your favourite magazine

Posted: Mon Dec 14, 2015 4:00 pm
by paranoid marvin
Remember when 'the change' happened in Crash! Was totally unexpected; without warning the mag went down to about 20 pages and came with a 'free' games cassette. The free games weren't even that good. Only bought another couple of issues and that was that.

I seem to remember an Atari mag (Atari User) which was a mag I bought when I had an A8, but by that time there may only be 1 or 2 games reviewed per issue. Sad times.

Re: The twilight years of your favourite magazine

Posted: Tue Dec 15, 2015 12:01 am
by kiwimike
To be honest I don't think I stayed with a magazine all the way through until the end...Im one of the reasons for the decline of them!
Usually I'd stick with a mag during my time with a current console, then move on as I change systems to a current-when younger. Nowadays I rarely buy a current system mag, reading reviews etc online instead. Only mags I buy are the likes of RG for history.
Would love to collect the entire original US Electronic games mag, but are far too expensive, especially postage wise

Re: The twilight years of your favourite magazine

Posted: Tue Dec 15, 2015 2:08 am
by rossi46
ST Format's withering death was a depressing time for me. Sega Pro was another great mag which was bought at the end of term and released as a 80 page, overpriced pamphlet. That was rubbish.

I, too remember the Mega changeover and the subsequent drop in quality and availability, but the one that bugged me most was the end of Sega Power. First it went to Saturn Power in a fanfare of optimism, but we all knew it wasn't going to last.

I really liked the Official Saturn Magazine, but I thought the gloating and offensive comments they published when SP went under was very poor.

Re: The twilight years of your favourite magazine

Posted: Tue Dec 15, 2015 2:32 am
by fredghostmaster
I stopped buying Crash the moment it slimmed down and put a cassette on the cover. I was actually gutted to see what they had done as there was no warning whatsoever. It was also the first moment it dawned on me the Speccy was dying and its golden days were over.

Re: The twilight years of your favourite magazine

Posted: Tue Dec 15, 2015 3:25 am
by killbot
rossi46 wrote:ST Format's withering death was a depressing time for me. Sega Pro was another great mag which was bought at the end of term and released as a 80 page, overpriced pamphlet. That was rubbish.

I, too remember the Mega changeover and the subsequent drop in quality and availability, but the one that bugged me most was the end of Sega Power. First it went to Saturn Power in a fanfare of optimism, but we all knew it wasn't going to last.

I really liked the Official Saturn Magazine, but I thought the gloating and offensive comments they published when SP went under was very poor.
Didn't Sega Power become the Official Sega Magazine, which then morphed into OSSM?

Re: The twilight years of your favourite magazine

Posted: Tue Dec 15, 2015 4:09 am
by rossi46
No.

Sega Power was a Future title that morphed into Saturn Power after 91 issues. Saturn Power ran for 11 issues. The official Sega mag (an Emap title) outlasted SP.

Re: The twilight years of your favourite magazine

Posted: Tue Dec 15, 2015 9:06 am
by knight_beat
rossi46 wrote:ST Format's withering death was a depressing time for me.
The ST magazine market was extremely odd towards the end. As I recall, ST Action was cancelled halfway through an issue and incorporated into ST User, with the half-complete 32 page issue being given away as a freebie. ST User was subsequently merged with ST Review to reduce costs, with ST Action being transferred to STR. A few months later ST Review was sold to Future and incorporated into ST Format - an event that annoys the STR editor, who had nothing good to say about the merger in his final editorial (STR had been waging a campaign against STF's questionable review tactics for several months, IIRC). Following this, the STR writers launch a new magazine called Atari World, which features 100 or so pages & 2 16-page supplements. This magazine lasts for almost a year, before disappearing unexpectedly, leaving ST Format as the sole remaining ST magazine.

There was also the odd controversy. Hundreds of ST Format readers apparently wrote in to complain about the editor's reference to 'Japs' in a review, accusing her of encouraging racist stereotypes. An issue of Atari World was also recalled and two pages depicting a semi-naked Barbie doll removed. The editor apologised and announced he was leaving the magazine in the next issue.

Re: The twilight years of your favourite magazine

Posted: Tue Dec 15, 2015 3:51 pm
by NorthWay
CU Amiga was a traincrash in slow motion. As a diehard you were waiting forever for that white knight to come and save the machine, but as time moved on you could see that the probability was waning, things to write about were drying up, and the user base was eroding. In the end it was a bit like Wile E Coyote running along and then carefully prodding with his hand to feel if the ground is still there under his feet - it inevitably wasn't and That was That.

Re: The twilight years of your favourite magazine

Posted: Wed Dec 16, 2015 6:38 am
by yakmag
What happened to PCG?

One month it was there, then it had gone!

That for me was the BEST magazine (then along came ZZap!)

Re: The twilight years of your favourite magazine

Posted: Wed Dec 16, 2015 6:45 am
by Timothy Redux
All my favourite or regular magazines died young: Personal Computer Games, Amtix, Big K - I bought them but they maybe lasted a year each?

Re: The twilight years of your favourite magazine

Posted: Wed Dec 16, 2015 7:02 am
by Antiriad2097
Oric Owner seemed like it started out in its twilight years. I never did get that full set, it was so irregular and rarely seen at newsagents, while my folks had a deep mistrust of mail order services, so I only managed about 5 or 6 issues (not that there are many more).

Shame as it was great to have a dedicated mag, but mostly I made do with the odd review or listing in any of the other multi format mags. Its not all bad though, it was probably more fun converting Speccy games listings to run on the Oric than it was to play them.

I think I must have bought all of the mags that covered Oric, Speccy and C64 at some point in their life. Crash was probably the most disappointing end, it just got so thin and frail. ST Format held out for a long while, but got somewhat dry with the lack of games releases and started doing more and more 'how to' articles that covered old ground for me.

Edge seems like it should have died years ago. At first it seemed new and fresh, a grown up games mag to fit with the grown up gamers, but it became so predictable and mundane, a rag for those in the industry rather than an entertainment piece.

Re: The twilight years of your favourite magazine

Posted: Wed Dec 16, 2015 7:22 am
by knight_beat
Antiriad2097 wrote: Crash was probably the most disappointing end, it just got so thin and frail.
Did you buy it until the end? The final redesign in #91 bumped up the page count to 68 pages. The final issue (#98) actually had 84 pages, which was greater than other Spectrum mags at the time.