Anyone went computing/video gaming at school?

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Antiriad2097
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Post by Antiriad2097 » Wed Sep 20, 2006 7:25 am

Mostly Apples in my day, II's iirc, though they were hoarded in the Maths dept and rarely ever let out. Locked up tight they were, only to be used for serious stuff.

Into secondary school, we got a short course in BASIC programming that lasted a few weeks, mainly running stuff on a couple of Speccys. I was able to teach the tutor a few things about error handling, keyboard scanning, graphics positioning etc 8)
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Post by psj3809 » Wed Sep 20, 2006 7:28 am

Its funny seeing PC's evolve as well. When i started work the machines were so crap back then, i do multimedia stuff so back then you could only use 16 colours, had to be on multiple floppy disks etc. Better graphic cards and cd drives were a godsend to us.

Back then every year or so you wanted a new computer, eg from 66 mhz - 100 mhz - 300 mhz.

Nowadays the price of computers its amazing and most of the top PC games havent 'caught up'. Back then to play some of the latest titles you needed to upgrade a ton of stuff including hardware (cd drive/3d card).

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Post by woody.cool » Wed Sep 20, 2006 7:38 am

I remember my secondary school buying a load of IBM PS/2's running DOS 6.22 & Windows 3.11. I thought they where w**k at the time. I was so stuck in my ways I thought that my Amiga 1200 was superior :lol:

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Post by Antiriad2097 » Wed Sep 20, 2006 7:48 am

woody.cool wrote:I remember my secondary school buying a load of IBM PS/2's running DOS 6.22 & Windows 3.11. I thought they where w**k at the time. I was so stuck in my ways I thought that my Amiga 1200 was superior :lol:
For games, it was :roll:
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Post by woody.cool » Wed Sep 20, 2006 7:52 am

I didn't like Windows 3.11 as an operating system at the time. I thought Amiga Workbench 3.0 (a.k.a. AmigaOS 3.0) was alot better and had more or less the same funtionality! When Windows 95 came out, we still didn't upgrade until a few years later. When I was in sixth from (same school) we finally made the jump from Windows 3.11 to Windows 98 Second Edition, which I think was a bit late considering it was the year 2000.
Maybe getting Windows 2000 would've been better.

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broton
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Post by broton » Wed Sep 20, 2006 9:22 am

P-Head wrote:All the computers at my High School were Nimbii.
Shouldn't that be Nimbi? Or were your machines "Nimbius"?

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Post by Sureshot » Wed Sep 20, 2006 10:36 am

Smurph wrote:We had BBC's in school too, I remember a stupid educational 'game' called Pob or summink. I also remember a game which, if memory serves, was quite good: I don't remember the name, but I think the graphics were mostly red, white and black. It was similar in style to Metroid too... Anyone know it?
Could be Exile.

We had BBCs at our school, with a bunch of edutainment titles such as Suburban Fox, Dread Dragon Droom, Jumbo, the Dust series and a few more. I also remember getting bollocked for making a copy of Fun School 2 so the school could use it, but then this was retracted after it said you could copy it for education purposes in the manual. I also used to write a few educational games out of magazines to take into school like Villager and so on. Amazing that these days I couldn't code BASIC to save my life!

After this, we had Archimedii, (where, no matter what I was doing, I was called upon to do techie stuff because there was no techie at the school) and I did get many bouts on the Nimbii at the school where my dad worked, with games like Mathemagical Adventure and the L Game (I think?).

Eventually, they got the fabled 'computer suite' with Archimedii in them, and when I went there after school to wait for a lift from my dad, I would always have some games to play as the 1337 h4x0rz that frequented the room had them on their areas in abundance. Of course, they passed down many trade secrets at the same time, meaning I could usually get into places that I probably wasn't meant to. I also remember once at a school open day that I went to, I was playing James Pond on one of the machines and some random old bloke came up and asked me for a copy!

Good times.
Last edited by Sureshot on Wed Sep 20, 2006 11:06 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by thl » Wed Sep 20, 2006 10:52 am

woody.cool wrote:
will2097 wrote:The game to play on the RMs was 'Snake'!
I remember playing on Snake for ages in school. I'd get into school early so I could fire-up the Ninbus and boot up Snake.

We also had some "RM 480Z Link's" in the a couple of classes. These were made by RM before the Nimbus and graphically were similar to the BBC Micro.
I still remembered playing the two player option with some classmates on Pirate Gold. That time controllers/joysticks weren't at all compatable, in which we had to use the keyboard as our main device. :lol:

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Post by woody.cool » Wed Sep 20, 2006 10:56 am

thl wrote:I still remembered playing the two player option with some classmates on Pirate Gold. That time controllers/joysticks weren't at all compatable, in which we had to use the keyboard as our main device. :lol:
Ooohhh! The cramptness of the multi-player keyboard-only game :lol:

Those were the days.

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Post by planetmatt » Wed Sep 20, 2006 11:00 am

I was in college from '93 to '95 right when Doom hit. We had a highjacked network user account and used the account's network space to store games. Then we used boot disks with batch files to connect to the network, copy and install Doom to the local machine and then run the game. We also made sure that if we quit the game, the batch file would load Word Perfect and a document so that we could cover our asses when the network techs were running around investigating the network lag.

Doom was just so massive anywhere with a network. We used to stay at college all evening lan gaming and play at each others houses at weekends.

Before that, PC gaming at school consisted of EGA games of Police Quest or Lemonade Stand, a lame game used to teach business and economics. These days it would be called Sim Lemonade Stand and sell millions. Going way back, we used to play Chuckie Egg and Repton on the BBCs

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Post by woody.cool » Wed Sep 20, 2006 11:06 am

planetmatt wrote:I was in college from '93 to '95 right when Doom hit. We had a highjacked network user account and used the account's network space to store games. Then we used boot disks with batch files to connect to the network, copy and install Doom to the local machine and then run the game. We also made sure that if we quit the game, the batch file would load Word Perfect and a document so that we could cover our asses when the network techs were running around investigating the network lag.

Doom was just so massive anywhere with a network. We used to stay at college all evening lan gaming and play at each others houses at weekends.

Before that, PC gaming at school consisted of EGA games of Police Quest or Lemonade Stand, a lame game used to teach business and economics. These days it would be called Sim Lemonade Stand and sell millions. Going way back, we used to play Chuckie Egg and Repton on the BBCs
I got kicked out of sixth-form for that.

Basically our Sys-Admin (or dopey IT Technician) left themselves logged on. So I opened up User Manager (Windows NT is sooooo easy to use) and changed my group membership from Domain Users to Domain Admins.

Now I installed DOOM on all the PC's in the IT suite and set up the networking componet of DOOM for multiplayer. I was on a computing course at the time so the knowledge was already there :lol:

Eventually I got caught, I tried to deny it but the SysAdmin (or Sissy) looked at my account and noticed I was a Domain Admin as well.

DAMN IT!!!!!! :evil:

Actually it didn't help that a censored Year 11 grassed me up to the head.

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Re:

Post by thl » Wed Sep 20, 2006 11:18 am

woody.cool wrote:
planetmatt wrote:I was in college from '93 to '95 right when Doom hit. We had a highjacked network user account and used the account's network space to store games. Then we used boot disks with batch files to connect to the network, copy and install Doom to the local machine and then run the game. We also made sure that if we quit the game, the batch file would load Word Perfect and a document so that we could cover our asses when the network techs were running around investigating the network lag.

Doom was just so massive anywhere with a network. We used to stay at college all evening lan gaming and play at each others houses at weekends.

Before that, PC gaming at school consisted of EGA games of Police Quest or Lemonade Stand, a lame game used to teach business and economics. These days it would be called Sim Lemonade Stand and sell millions. Going way back, we used to play Chuckie Egg and Repton on the BBCs
I got kicked out of sixth-form for that.

Basically our Sys-Admin (or dopey IT Technician) left themselves logged on. So I opened up User Manager (Windows NT is sooooo easy to use) and changed my group membership from Domain Users to Domain Admins.

Now I installed DOOM on all the PC's in the IT suite and set up the networking componet of DOOM for multiplayer. I was on a computing course at the time so the knowledge was already there :lol:

Eventually I got caught, I tried to deny it but the SysAdmin (or Sissy) looked at my account and noticed I was a Domain Admin as well.

DAMN IT!!!!!! :evil:

Actually it didn't help that a censored Year 11 grassed me up to the head.
When I was studying at college, I received some news from my old secondary school (thanks to the past classmates).

This guy named Henry who I knew back then, got caught for playing Doom 2 on the school PC! The teacher witnessed the sound of gun-shots and bloody gores on the screen. He was told by her to turn it off and not to bring it in ever again. And indeed it got banned!!:o

He was so crazy that he played it in front of under-aged pupils. When the teachers weren't around during the break time, he always have to take the risk. He also sent some pupils to stay alert on the teachers, who're likely to come in and out of the classroom.:o

He also had other first-person shooter that includes Quake II and Unreal.

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Post by psj3809 » Wed Sep 20, 2006 11:32 am

When i worked at ICL they were quite relaxed about playing games during lunchtime or after work.

Worked in a big old building and after hours playing Quake/Half Life your adrenalin was still totally pumped up and it was even freaky walking back to your car !

Networked Command and Conquer was brilliant, then Quake II and of course Half Life. Multiplayer games like that are just brilliant.

Used to play Capture the Flag on Quake II over the net, worked wonders then even on a 56k modem.

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Re:

Post by planetmatt » Wed Sep 20, 2006 11:33 am

woody.cool wrote:
I got kicked out of sixth-form for that.

Basically our Sys-Admin (or dopey IT Technician) left themselves logged on. So I opened up User Manager (Windows NT is sooooo easy to use) and changed my group membership from Domain Users to Domain Admins.

Now I installed DOOM on all the PC's in the IT suite and set up the networking componet of DOOM for multiplayer. I was on a computing course at the time so the knowledge was already there :lol:

Eventually I got caught, I tried to deny it but the SysAdmin (or Sissy) looked at my account and noticed I was a Domain Admin as well.

DAMN IT!!!!!! :evil:

Actually it didn't help that a censored Year 11 grassed me up to the head.
Windows pah! We had to do it with DOS 5 and Netware. Back then, you didnt have 100mb switched to the desktop as most of the infrastructure was 10mbps through hubs. Start a mutliplayer game of Doom and the network would grind to a crawl and the techies would come running. We got caught a few times but never kicked out. Another college gaming memory I just recalled was Scorched Earth, a pre Worms turn based artillary based game. Cracking stuff and still playable today.

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Post by Sureshot » Wed Sep 20, 2006 11:34 am

In my secondary school, we had GTA on pretty much every PC possible, and there were the odd occasions (usually during xmas) where our teachers would let us play lanned Quake 2.

Oh, and somehow they also let a Duke 3D tournament be played one week during lunchtimes. I don't think any of the participants were 18 :wink:

Bar this, we still had Archies around which had the likes of Moonquake and Aggressor loaded onto them (by yours truly).

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