Which System Killed the Arcade??

Discuss and discover all the great games of yesteryear!

Moderators: mknott, NickThorpe, lcarlson, Darran@Retro Gamer, MMohammed

User avatar
bonerlaw
Posts: 3043
Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 3:05 pm

Re: Which System Killed the Arcade??

Post by bonerlaw » Wed Feb 03, 2010 4:27 pm

When you think about it, the PS1 sort of started alongside the arcades in terms of quality (Ridge Racer), but over its time, it slowly but surely overtook in quality titles!

Love my PS1, but if it is responsible for the death of the arcades, I kinda feel weird about it now. Its like at school were your best friend snogged the girl you like.....there still your best friend, but a little less! :wink:
Image

User avatar
woody.cool
Posts: 8809
Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2006 3:29 am
Location: Northampton, UK
Contact:

Re: Which System Killed the Arcade??

Post by woody.cool » Wed Feb 03, 2010 4:35 pm

Definitely the original Playstation or 'PS1' if you prefer to call it that.

Once the original Playstation hit the shelves, with it's arcade perfect convertions, you no longer needed to go to the arcade to play the 'ultimate version' of a game, as you could bring that experience home, without having to chuck 50p or £1 in each time.

Jekylls Phd
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Oct 14, 2009 4:55 pm

Re: Which System Killed the Arcade??

Post by Jekylls Phd » Wed Feb 03, 2010 4:44 pm

I'd have to say both the ps1 and the Saturn, but equally. Ultimately though I think it all comes down to which publisher of arcade games you preferred as to which console stopped you feeding the slots
Last edited by Jekylls Phd on Wed Feb 03, 2010 4:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
ToxieDogg
Posts: 8356
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2005 8:54 am
Location: Vice City, a.k.a. 'Liverpool'

Re: Which System Killed the Arcade??

Post by ToxieDogg » Wed Feb 03, 2010 4:44 pm

bonerlaw wrote:Im gonna go out on a limb here, do most people think it was the PS1??? :wink:
Yeah, pretty much. Me too.

To be honest, my first thought was SNES/MD, that's the era when arcades started losing their sparkle for me....I loved Street Fighter 2 when it first appeared in arcades and even though the home conversions were never 100% perfect, they were more than good enough for me and my mates. And with a group of us around having Street Fighter 2 tournaments of a weekend, much more cost effective than shovelling all of our pocket money into an arcade machine too. And the idea of spending £50 on an epic, sprawling RPG like Zelda: Link To The Past or Secret Of Mana that we knew would last us for days became a lot more appealing than the idea of burning through maybe £10 in a couple of hours at an arcade, and then not being able to take the arcade machine home afterwards. And sometimes the games were even better than their arcade counterparts, such as Turtles In Time having an extra couple of levels and bosses added to it.

When the PS1 arrived and showcased Ridge Racer and Tekken, that sealed the deal....arcades were officially dying, they just didn't know it quite yet.

The price per play of arcade games also helped kill them off....whilst I have fond memories of chucking 10ps into games like Bubble Bobble and getting a fair amount of play for £1, I certainly don't miss paying 50p-£1 a go for more recent games with ridiculous learning curves that guarantee your first play will only last around 20 seconds :evil:
Sig pic temporarily removed...The Magnificent 7 will ride again 8)
Lost Dragon wrote:The 1st rule about Feedback is..

You do not give Feedback!

User avatar
Matt_B
Posts: 5465
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2007 5:30 am
Location: 5 minutes from the beach, 30 seconds from the pub

Re: Which System Killed the Arcade??

Post by Matt_B » Wed Feb 03, 2010 4:51 pm

For me it was the Spectrum. It's not because it was a particularly brilliant machine for arcade ports though; indeed most of them were pretty awful. Rather, the original games for it just offered a far better experience than arcade machines that are fundamentally designed to give you a few minutes of flash, bang, wallop and then extract some more cash from you.

Romulous
Posts: 1351
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2008 4:46 am
Location: Somewhere in Time
Contact:

Re: Which System Killed the Arcade??

Post by Romulous » Wed Feb 03, 2010 4:53 pm

There are a few things IMO that helped kill the Arcades.

Extortionate prices that you would have to pay to play a game, knowing fine well that the operator had ramped up the difficulty to ensure minimal play time.

Gun games, mis calibrated so that you were shooting wildly, anywhere except where you were pointing.

Then add in the multitude of Rhythm games and cabinets that were as big as a house so no one could actually afford them.

Operators that were to selfish to fix broken controllers yet could not give 2 fits when you lost your money on a game that didn't work properly.

Thats what killed them.

The arrival of the PS1 gave people the opportunity to enjoy arcade graphics in the comfort of thier home, no need to worry about breathing in someone elses fag smoke, or losing a pile of money.
Failure isn't about falling down, failure is staying down.

Romulous

Image

User avatar
C=Style
Posts: 9053
Joined: Thu May 03, 2007 4:07 pm
Contact:

Re: Which System Killed the Arcade??

Post by C=Style » Wed Feb 03, 2010 5:02 pm

I'm gonna say Sega Saturn because I didn't really care for any of the Namco arcade games of that era, it was all about the Sega/Capcom arcade games like Virtua Cop, Sega Rally, House of the Dead, Manx TT, Die Hard Arcade, Daytona USA, Xmen COTA and Alpha 2 which I used to play in the arcades loads, and the Saturn had amazing (almost) arcade perfect conversions.

For me the Sega Saturn was THE arcade console of the 90's.
Image

speedlolita
Posts: 7056
Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2009 10:46 am

Re: Which System Killed the Arcade??

Post by speedlolita » Wed Feb 03, 2010 5:31 pm

PlayStation/Saturn.

This is when home hardware was as good as arcade hardware - thus arcades lost most of their appeal.
Logged out 15/07/2014.

User avatar
GigaPepsiMan
Posts: 2692
Joined: Wed Nov 11, 2009 5:06 pm

Re: Which System Killed the Arcade??

Post by GigaPepsiMan » Wed Feb 03, 2010 5:45 pm

I'm the same as everyone in this thread.
Romulous can be credited with giving the best reasons IMO.
I live in a seaside town so there are plently of arcades and he is right about more or less all of the points.
I've never got past the 2nd stage of my arcades Super Street Fighter 2, they have messed with the games settings I'm not that bad.
Broken and over priced arcade games 50p for a faulty Datona USA with a sterring wheel that nearly trook my arm off (it spins itself turning can be painful).
A point blnk machine with a light gun that doesn't even work I can point out many problems.
Most of the machines in my town are either fauklty or have a screen problem.
The PS1 and Saturn are not to fully blame.

User avatar
Freestyler
Posts: 4150
Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 3:15 pm

Re: Which System Killed the Arcade??

Post by Freestyler » Wed Feb 03, 2010 5:59 pm

I got to the point where I was actually thinking "Should I spend 50p a go on this or wait for it to come to Playstation and play it for free?"

That killed it for me. Why play Tekken 3 in the arcade when the Playstation version would be so much more?
Freestyler: A customer that's too hard to please, complains all the time and wants everything for next to nothing.

User avatar
RMLF
Posts: 3210
Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2005 2:54 am
Location: Lost in the Ether

Re: Which System Killed the Arcade??

Post by RMLF » Wed Feb 03, 2010 6:54 pm

Iam going to say,

The early 1990s recession, The dearth of the Uk seaside Holiday and the switch away from computer based gaming to console based gaming ( in general Nes, Mastersystem, Snes, Megadrive I think it was already dead/dying by PS1 era)

WHAT? You may say, but lets take a case in point

Weston Super Mare, hade an avenue of Arcades that Stretched from the Pier to the main shopping street c. 1990-2. These included a huge Mr. B ( with Quasar, Plus Night Club on the Back) few other Multi fronted efforts, then there was a number of other arcades all with More Games than bandits, Infact the Olympia actually expanded during this time.

Then late 1992-4 things changed. No one ( in comparison) was coming to Weston anymore, not for their Jollys or even day trips, Places like 'Sadly Broke' bore the brunt of the recession and subsequent climb back, no one had money for trips to the seaside, if they did, sure as hell werent speding money on arcades! Weston had become a mess. And while Sedgemoor council spent money to rejuvenate the town centre, the arcades began to look tired... Smaller ones began to fall away and the small seaside shops that usually opened in season, didnt open at all. Some of the side streets became like ghost towns with closed and boarded up shops.

With a lack of money coming into the resort, the arcades began to fade away. Sedgemoor Council massively increasing Business rates iirc causing many of the Smaller Arcades to shut and for the first time, there were gaps appearing in what was a majestic line of arcades.

With more people not going on holiday due to skintness or beginning to go abroad as the prices got cheaper c1993 onwards compared to 'in season' holidays over here' the the arcades had to adapt to survive. Rather than concentrate on pulling in seasonal punters they had to be able to attract and keep the locals busy.. Logically it could have been Video games, but kids could now get them at home shortly their after so repeated business fell away.

The jump from Computers where games were 1.99- 25 quid to.. 20-80 plus for a game meant that budgets were spent elsewhere and certainly with the latest releases at 50, £1, or even higher (because the Machine rental companys wanted Zillions) It was cheaper to get a gaming license if not already got one.. and then get reconned or buy/hire bandits, plus they would be used all year round, a quick gamble rather than waiting for a go on an arcade machine, woud at least mean money was coming in, and it was less faddy people will always put money in slots but the latest games dont always stay good earners and then you have space being taken up which could be better utilised, yet is wasted

The arcades in Weston had to adapt to survive. ( see the quiz machine explosion of the late 1990s-2000 who didnt see Millionaire et al in arcades? amongst other things) Many didnt.

From that it never recovered Quasar went tits up in Mr B' then Mr' Bs went ( the Quasar went the night club at the back was redeveloped as was more profitable, Bar Uropa) Mr Bs itself went a few years later c 1997-9 Its now part pub, part chinese although I havent not been for ages so may be different again. Last time I went to Weston, the Pier ( whih was then subsequently re fitted and stripped of most of its game before it burnt down) and The Olympia were pretty much the sole survivors. There were lots of bandits, but also a fine selection of video games in both, but nothing like their heyday.


Point is its a combination of factors and would be a truly inspiring bit of social history... Id love to do it, but wouldnt know where to start?
The Artist Formerly Known as Ralph Milne's Left Foot :P

Wheres Gus Ceasar when you need him?... Pah!

Ralph's Trade/Sale Thread http://www.retrogamer.net/forum/viewtop ... =6&t=22769

hungry_hog
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2007 10:02 am

Re: Which System Killed the Arcade??

Post by hungry_hog » Wed Feb 03, 2010 7:47 pm

I would actually say the MD and SNES.

Previous to them you had the 16 bit home computers. Whilst technically strong, they were restricted by dodgy control methods (one button joysticks) and horrible conversions (remember Tiertex? :evil: ). There were a few exceptions such as Rainbow Islands.

When the MD came out it seemed like a big jump. The sprites were bigger, there were three buttons on the joypad, plus a start button, it gave the "feeling" of an arcade. You had top conversions like Strider, Golden Axe and Ghouls 'n Ghosts and they felt like the arcade. In fact Golden Axe had extra levels on the MD version.

The conversion of SF2 to SNES was pivotal as well. It was the biggest game in the arcades by an absolute mile. Once you could play it on the SNES there wasn't much reason to go to an arcade, other than to play a 3D driving game. But those games were a pound a go, so people started to see arcades as a novelty.

I don't think the 3D conversions for PS / Saturn (Tekken, Ridge Racer, Virtua Fighter) were as close to the arcade as the 2D ones from the 16 bit era (furthers examples - Mercs, Alien Storm, Area 88), and in fact the gap for 3D was only closed once the Dreamcast came out.

User avatar
Antiriad2097
Posts: 26886
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2005 2:48 pm
Location: http://s11.zetaboards.com/RetroLeague/
Contact:

Re: Which System Killed the Arcade??

Post by Antiriad2097 » Thu Feb 04, 2010 1:57 am

Romulous wrote:Gun games, mis calibrated so that you were shooting wildly, anywhere except where you were pointing.

Then add in the multitude of Rhythm games and cabinets that were as big as a house so no one could actually afford them.

Operators that were to selfish to fix broken controllers yet could not give 2 fits when you lost your money on a game that didn't work properly.
I disagree.

Our local arcade was well maintained and would give credit for lost games, but it was the specialist cabs with fancy guns, dance mats, proper force feedback steering etc that made it worth visiting now and then, Experiences that couldn't easily be replicated at home. Now we have dance mats, full band controls, decent wheels, motion and board control - its all eating into the arcade's unique space.
Last edited by Antiriad2097 on Thu Feb 04, 2010 2:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
The Retro League - Where skill isn't an obstacle
Retrocanteen, home of the unfairly banned
Tom_Baker wrote:I just finished watching a film about Stockholm syndrome. It started out terrible but by the end I really liked it.

kiwimike
Posts: 3696
Joined: Fri Jul 13, 2007 3:20 am
Location: Chch, NZ

Re: Which System Killed the Arcade??

Post by kiwimike » Thu Feb 04, 2010 2:41 am

hungry_hog wrote:I would actually say the MD and SNES.

Previous to them you had the 16 bit home computers. Whilst technically strong, they were restricted by dodgy control methods (one button joysticks) and horrible conversions (remember Tiertex? :evil: ). There were a few exceptions such as Rainbow Islands.

When the MD came out it seemed like a big jump. The sprites were bigger, there were three buttons on the joypad, plus a start button, it gave the "feeling" of an arcade. You had top conversions like Strider, Golden Axe and Ghouls 'n Ghosts and they felt like the arcade. In fact Golden Axe had extra levels on the MD version.

The conversion of SF2 to SNES was pivotal as well. It was the biggest game in the arcades by an absolute mile. Once you could play it on the SNES there wasn't much reason to go to an arcade, other than to play a 3D driving game. But those games were a pound a go, so people started to see arcades as a novelty.

I don't think the 3D conversions for PS / Saturn (Tekken, Ridge Racer, Virtua Fighter) were as close to the arcade as the 2D ones from the 16 bit era (furthers examples - Mercs, Alien Storm, Area 88), and in fact the gap for 3D was only closed once the Dreamcast came out.
Yes, I would agree with that. The NES/SMS era hurt the arcades big time, but still weren't quite there. The SNES/MD nailed it- And it's been since then the Arcade has been fighting to be one step ahead to keep punters, heading to the 3D- Which PS and Saturn trumped with killer home conversions, to the family friendly gimmick games...which is clearly where the idea for Wii came about IMO.
The Arcade is still around, but needing more expensive stand alone hardware to make a point of difference.

User avatar
joefish
Posts: 3072
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 9:05 pm

Re: Which System Killed the Arcade??

Post by joefish » Thu Feb 04, 2010 4:32 am

Can I take a different tack and say House of the Dead (Arcade)? This for me was the first noticeable example of a game that was designed not for you to get better and better at, but just to take your money. It was probably a big earner, but it shifted arcades from being full of enthusiasts trying to better their previous games to a fast turnover of casual visitors. SEGA were the worst. Around the 90s they shifted from long-lasting games to short and limited plays that cost more and more. Their hydraulic cabinets were awesome, but once they started regularly making dedicated hardware, the games suffered. Maybe it was about divergence between the types of games you got in arcades and the ones you played at home, but it didn't help the arcades.

Of course there were a whole host of factors really - recession, cheaper foreign holidays making the British seaside a less popular destination.

And then there was Namco's association with the Playstation. Soon after they gave a huge boost to the arcades with textured 3D (Ridge Racer, Tekken), they converted those games to the PS1, effectively stripping the arcades of being the place to play the latest and best games. All that was left for the arcades was the show-pieces with the dedicated cabinets such as whole cars as controllers and gameplay designed to get you off the machine or putting in another credit as soon as possible. Although to be fair to Namco, their games are nowhere near as bad on that front as SEGA's.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest