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I bought a Eee PC

Posted: Thu Oct 16, 2008 4:09 am
by boyo
Ordered a Eee PC 900 with XP on board from Amazon on Wednesday this week.

It has a 12GB static disk which I intend to load full of emulators and games. Just waiting for it to arrive now :D

Cost £199.

Re: I bought a Eee PC

Posted: Thu Oct 16, 2008 4:11 am
by chewy
boyo wrote:Ordered a Eee PC 900 with XP on board from Amazon on Wednesday this week.

It has a 12GB static disk which I intend to load full of emulaors and games. Just waiting for it to arrive now :D
Are these things any good? I'd like a little PC to browse t'internet on...

Posted: Thu Oct 16, 2008 4:52 am
by boyo
It just arrived!!!

Posted: Thu Oct 16, 2008 4:55 am
by Lorfarius
Well thats you gone for a couple of days :wink:

Posted: Fri Oct 17, 2008 7:16 am
by Vir_Lucis
At that price i have to wonder...

What benefit would there be in buying a Pandora for the same amount? Seeing as how an Eee PC could run every emulator that is out there right?

Would this be the better route to go for hand-held emulation?

Posted: Fri Oct 17, 2008 8:33 am
by Matt_B
Vir_Lucis wrote:At that price i have to wonder...

What benefit would there be in buying a Pandora for the same amount? Seeing as how an Eee PC could run every emulator that is out there right?

Would this be the better route to go for hand-held emulation?
The Pandora is less than half the size and will fit in your pocket. If you can't see the point in that, then you would indeed be much better off with an Eee PC.

Posted: Fri Oct 17, 2008 9:30 am
by Vir_Lucis
Okay cool, i didn't realise it was that much smaller actually.

But still...for me then i think i will be going the Eee PC route - but give it another year or so and they will be a bit more compact and that bit more powerful :D

Looking forward to hearing thoughts from people who have them and are using them for emulation...

Posted: Sat Oct 18, 2008 5:24 am
by Matt_B
Vir_Lucis wrote:Okay cool, i didn't realise it was that much smaller actually.

But still...for me then i think i will be going the Eee PC route - but give it another year or so and they will be a bit more compact and that bit more powerful :D

Looking forward to hearing thoughts from people who have them and are using them for emulation...
I've only run a Spectrum emulator (Fuse) on it but it works just fine. You ought to be able to run just about any Linux/Windows emulator that's not too demanding on them though. The main thing you might have to watch out for is that the screen is only 480 pixels high which means that most apps will fill about half your screen with taskbars. Later models have gone for a 1024x600 screen which should work better.

Although it's already possible to make computers a lot smaller (take a look at the OQO for instance) the limiting factor is the keyboard. The Eee PC is already at about the bottom limit of what's a useful size for touch typing, and that's really what separates out a home computer from a console, mobile phone or PDA these days.

On the other hand, if you're one of those lucky people sufficiently dexterous to be able to type on an HTC Touch Pro, it's only a matter of time before we get a fully featured PC of that size.

Posted: Sat Oct 18, 2008 6:01 am
by miner2049er
HTC hardware is great.

I'm on my second HTC phone, (TYTN2) and it's superb.

I am selling one of these if anyone is interested before I ebay it.

It will work as a fully functioning Sat Nav device too with a Bluetooth GPS receiver that I am also selling. It is not the best phone but the PDA functions and the ability to use it for Sat Nav are great.

BTW, the OQO is suppose to be great to use and the ability to dock it makes it a winner.

Posted: Sat Oct 18, 2008 6:10 am
by miner2049er
At work we have a coupole of EEEPCs and I don't like them.

We have another ASUS one which is similar but the screen rotates and folds down to make it a tablet PC.

That too is not very good. The battery life on both of them is quite poor. They are too big to be truly portable and too small to be ujsed for anything other than a quick search and email.

I am using a Dell D410 which is a small laptop that isn't mjuch bigger than an EEEPC but is so much more useful. has a full sized keyboard, 1024x768 resolution and good battery life.

Being a Dell, the hard drive easily slides out and I have a couple set up with different Operating Systems, one packed with emulators. One is triple booted with Leopard, Vista and Ubuntu.

The EEEPC imo misses both the portable and the laptop markets.

Posted: Sat Oct 18, 2008 9:56 am
by Matt_B
miner2049er wrote:At work we have a coupole of EEEPCs and I don't like them.

We have another ASUS one which is similar but the screen rotates and folds down to make it a tablet PC.

That too is not very good. The battery life on both of them is quite poor. They are too big to be truly portable and too small to be ujsed for anything other than a quick search and email.

I am using a Dell D410 which is a small laptop that isn't mjuch bigger than an EEEPC but is so much more useful. has a full sized keyboard, 1024x768 resolution and good battery life.

Being a Dell, the hard drive easily slides out and I have a couple set up with different Operating Systems, one packed with emulators. One is triple booted with Leopard, Vista and Ubuntu.

The EEEPC imo misses both the portable and the laptop markets.
Comparing them with the D410 isn't exactly fair; it's about twice as heavy and was originally about six times the price too, although it can now be picked up quite cheaply as it's getting on a bit.

Also, which Eee PCs have you tried? The early ones are indeed quite slow and the battery life isn't great. However, Asus did a great job of fixing nearly all the gripes with the more recent 1000 model which has a bigger screen, a much better keyboard, a faster CPU and a battery life of up to 7 hours.

Posted: Sat Oct 18, 2008 11:04 am
by miner2049er
Matt_B wrote:Comparing them with the D410 isn't exactly fair; it's about twice as heavy and was originally about six times the price too, although it can now be picked up quite cheaply as it's getting on a bit.
Yeah, it helps that I got two of them free along with an X300.
Matt_B wrote:Also, which Eee PCs have you tried? The early ones are indeed quite slow and the battery life isn't great. However, Asus did a great job of fixing nearly all the gripes with the more recent 1000 model which has a bigger screen, a much better keyboard, a faster CPU and a battery life of up to 7 hours.
The EEEPC was an early one with the speakers at the side of the screen which was one of the major gripes we had.

TBH though, if I was buying something like that, I would still go with a small form factor laptop rather than a webtop or whatever they are known as because of all the extras that go with it. Particularly standard parts, screen size and resolution, full choice of Operating Systems.

I just don't get the market for them I guess.

Posted: Sat Oct 18, 2008 9:31 pm
by Matt_B
miner2049er wrote:The EEEPC was an early one with the speakers at the side of the screen which was one of the major gripes we had.

TBH though, if I was buying something like that, I would still go with a small form factor laptop rather than a webtop or whatever they are known as because of all the extras that go with it. Particularly standard parts, screen size and resolution, full choice of Operating Systems.

I just don't get the market for them I guess.
They're cheap and do everything that 90% of home users want; that's their market. :wink:

Posted: Sun Oct 19, 2008 4:27 am
by miner2049er
Matt_B wrote:They're cheap and do everything that 90% of home users want; that's their market. :wink:
I bet 90% of home users never leave home with their laptop though.

I don't think that is the market.

I think it's more aimed at business travellers currently using PDAs or Palms, maybe even journalists looking to upload photos on the move. Both of whom would be better served with a small laptop.

Posted: Sun Oct 19, 2008 6:50 am
by Matt_B
miner2049er wrote:I bet 90% of home users never leave home with their laptop though.
I agree. That's largely because most home laptops are too bulky and fragile to be used comfortably on the move. I certainly wouldn't take mine anywhere where there's not going to be a desk and a power supply at the other end.

The Eee PC is at least a bit more portable than that, although certainly not in the same league as a PDA.
I don't think that is the market.

I think it's more aimed at business travellers currently using PDAs or Palms, maybe even journalists looking to upload photos on the move. Both of whom would be better served with a small laptop.
Really? :shock:

Whatever gave you that idea? There's certainly nothing on their website that gives that impression and their tag line is "Easy to learn, work and play". I've always seen it as an upmarket version of the OLPC that's sufficiently more powerful and stylish for adults to want to use it too. In that context it might make a bit more sense.

Certainly, if they were aiming at the business market they've missed it by a million miles. However, that's not stopped them from selling like the proverbial hot cakes to the home market.