Issue 168 PET feature - DVD extras

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Issue 168 PET feature - DVD extras

Post by merman » Thu Jun 01, 2017 12:47 pm

Welcome to the DVD extras thread for the Commodore PET article featured in issue 168.

With a feature like this, there is only so much you can cram into the space. So below I will be sharing the extended interview text.


Here's some insights into the production process.

The boxouts originally had a "themed" named.

The BEST IN SHOW remained the same. Blame the fact Crufts had just been on the telly.
ESSENTIAL PETS became Essential Pet Games.
ADVENTUROUS PETS became Questing on the PET.

The essential list were my personal choices, to show a greater variety than was mentioned in the text. If you read the PET GAMEBASE section too you will see several more recommendations.

The screenshots - many of them were originally amber. This reflected the later model of PET that came with an amber rather than green monitor. Some of the shots were then re-tinted to green in the design phase.


And now some unused screenshots...

Image
[PET] A sneak preview of Kevin Pickell’s Paladin, coming soon in PET GameBase v3.

Image
How to add sound to the PET

Image
Defend Tokyo from Godzilla in this fun strategy game, later remade for VIC and C64

Image
Blok Copy for the PET

Image
Cosine's Bumblebee demo for the PET features a PETSCII image of Jack Tramiel

Image
Tetris on the PET
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Re: Issue 168 PET feature - DVD extras

Post by merman » Thu Jun 01, 2017 12:49 pm

Peter Calver interview:

Q. What were your earliest experiences of computers?

The first programming I did was on programmable calculators - I wrote an accounting program
for the company I was working for in 1977, and then helped design a more comprehensive
system on a DEC PDP11/45 minicomputer with 18 terminals, and disk drives that looked like
tumble dryers, with enormous and very fragile removable platters. It was impossibly slow if all
the terminals were in use - it didn't help that the computer only had 128k words (256k bytes) of
memory. The system needed an air-conditioned room of its own.


Q. When did you get hold of a Commodore PET?

In 1978 I saw the PET and other early computers (Apple II and TRS-80) in the Byte Ship in
Ilford, and after some months of indecision decided on a PET.


Q. Do you remember how much it cost at the time?

They were all very expensive, but I found a dealer in Luton who offered a 5% discount, bringing
the price of my 8k PET down from £695 to a mere £660. Two years earlier I'd bought a
3-bedroomed house for £8500, so as you can see, it was a lot of money for the time.


Q. How did you learn to program?

I taught myself BASIC and then learned to program in assembly language. Well, first I wrote an
assembler in BASIC - there was nothing available in the UK in those days.


Q. What made you start up the company Supersoft?

It was hard to get hold of software so I decided I may as well write my own. Within less than a
week of buying the PET I placed an advert in Personal Computer World, and Supersoft was
born. Supersoft was my third choice name - I would have preferred Microsoft or Petsoft, but both
had already been taken. (As it turned out Supersoft had also been taken by a company in
Chicago, but I didn't discover that until many years later, by which time we were well-established
in Europe.)

Once I started advertising my games I was contacted by other authors who wanted me to publish
theirs. Most of them were technically far better programmers than I was, so I was delighted.


Q. Supersoft sold games and utilities for the PET " which sold better?

None of them were massive sellers in the early days - when I started I don't suppose there were
more than 2000 come computers of all types in the UK. I remember going to a computer club -
probably in early 1979 - where everyone seemed to know more about computers than I did -
they kept talking about S-100 buses. But eventually I realised I was the only one there who
actually owned a computer!

The biggest seller was probably a spreadsheet program I came up with in 1982, called Busicalc -
the name was a play on Visicalc, which had been the first ever spreadsheet program. But the
program that made our reputation (in 1980) was a utility I wrote called the Petmaster Superchip
(usually referred to as the Supership) - it was the first software to be sold in a plug-in chip in the
UK (and possibly in Europe).

However in terms of revenue we probably made as much or more from the high-resolution
graphic boards that we sold. By today's standards they weren't high resolution, but the PET
didn't have pixel graphics, so anything was an improvement. The high-resolution boards mostly
sold to businesses, who used them as part of industrial systems.


Q. Air Attack is seen as a forerunner of the Blitz genre and was much imitated, how did you come up with the idea?

In the summer of 1979 my brother told me about an arcade game he'd seen called Canyon
Bomber, which had a plane flying over a canyon with pillars of rock.

Without seeing the game myself (in fact, I only saw it for the first time many years later), I started
to program it on the PET based on my brother's description. When I got it working, probably only
a couple of hours later, I realised that it would be much more interesting as a cityscape with
skyscrapers.

I was both annoyed and flattered when Commodore launched the VIC-20 with Blitz. I guess it
was my fault for putting the listing in a magazine - then again, I got an enormous amount of
publicity from Personal Computer World over the years so it was probably worth it.


Q. Whose idea was it to put a listing of the simplified game in a magazine, advertising the full version?

It was my idea - and it wasn't a simplified version, it was the whole game. But when someone
bought the game from Supersoft it came with a coloured overlay which really enhanced it, and
not everyone wanted to type in a listing (and, in any case, because of all the graphics characters
it wasn't easy to get it right).


Q. What gave you the idea to make a screen overlay to add colour?

The arcade game Breakout used a similar technique - so I thought I'd do the same. It was
extremely effective, but making the overlays was a bit fiddly, so in a way I was glad when
Commodore switched to green screens (which didn't work nearly so well with coloured overlays).


Q. Did you write any other PET games?

I wrote loads of other PET games, but none was as memorable as Air Attack.


Q. Do you still have any PET hardware?

Loads, but I doubt any of it would work if I powered it up. Any electronics engineers reading this?
Hide original message


Q. Looking back, how important was the PET to your career and business?

It was crucially important, because it wasn't just a games machine or a machine for the home, so
there was a market for a wider range of software. When I bought the PET I knew I was likely to
be made redundant the following year, so it was a way of providing me with an alternative career
option.
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Re: Issue 168 PET feature - DVD extras

Post by merman » Thu Jun 01, 2017 12:50 pm

Revival Studios interview:
Q. Did you own a PET when you were younger?

While I did own a Commodore 64 like many I did not own an actual PET myself as these were more sold as business/educational machines back in the day. However, I did get a chance to work and program on the PET at a young age, as part of a local youth initiative called "De Jonge Onderzoekers'" (The Young Researchers) that provided programming courses for kids.


Q. Do you own any physical PET hardware now?

Yes of course I do! I did have 2 systems (80 column and 40 column) before which I also used for testing, but I have sold the 80-column model in favor of the more standardised 40-column model, which I still use for playing and testing.


Q. What prompted you to start programming PET games?

As with most of my games on vintage home computers and consoles, I like the challenge! In the case of the PET I like designing games for a 40x25 PETSCII character set. Using these restrictions, it allows for different ways of thinking, which can often lead to new and create game ideas in the process.


Q. How many games have you made so far, and which is your favourite?

So far i have released 7 games: Avalanche, Mayhem, Down! Stairrunner, Shifted, Rush and Boxing Champ, and I hope to release more games in the future. I like all my games, because I only release a game when I think it can add something to the library that I haven’t played before myself. However I think the game loops of Rush and Mayhem will appeal to many people, because of their fast-paced arcade action.
Personally I also like Boxing Champ a lot, as it combines strategy and arcade gameplay well.


Q. How easy is it to transfer the gameplay from another Commodore machine to the PET?

I believe it is always easier/better to work towards a clearly defined end-product instead of not knowing in advance what the end-result will end up like. This is probably why the 80s had many clones of famous arcade titles and also why I convert some of my games to different platforms. However, there are also games, like Boxing Champ, that started their life on the PET and got converted from there (so far only to the ZX81).


Q. What software and hardware do you use to develop games?

For game development I use a combination of Assembler with some C for game logic. I also built custom tools myself that will allow me to design backgrounds and sprites using the PETSCII set. For testing I use emulators and real hardware.


Q. What games do you think are best suited to the PET?

I personally like using the PETSCII set as I think it gives the games that PET charm and recognizable style. Using this approach, I think there is no limit to what can be achieved if you are creative. For example my game Rush uses parallax scrolling backgrounds for example.


Q. What do you think of the PET emulators now available?

I'm using emulators throughout the development and I think they work fine for some basic testing. However I strongly recommend any developer to also test on the real hardware, as there are some issues with key-mapping and 80-column conversion stuff that only appear on the real hardware.


Q. What are your favourite PET games of all time?

Honestly, I like my some of my own game like Rush, Mayhem and Boxing Champ a lot.
As for the original releases, I kinda like Scramble a lot because of its arcade-style gameplay.


Q. Have you played other homebrew available for the PET?

Yes of course, it is always good to see other people support the system as well! The more, the better!


Q. Any plans for more PET games?

Yes, most definitely. I am currently working on a game in the same vein as Mayhem, which should also have a nice and tight gameplay loop. Furth more I’m looking to convert a Videopac game called Cavity to the system and I have a prototype for a working CHIP8 emulator for the system, which will allow for a number of CHIP8 games and demos to run on the trusty old PET.

Just keep an eye out for these new games on my website at http://www.revival-studios.com



-
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Re: Issue 168 PET feature - DVD extras

Post by merman » Thu Jun 01, 2017 12:52 pm

Mr. NOP interview:

Q. Did you own a PET when you were younger?

We owned a PET computer about the same time we had a Commodore 64. We also had two 8050 disk drives. Using an adapter we could use the drives with our Commodore 64. Most of my PET activities came from spending lunch hours and after school time in the computer room at junior high school.


Q. Do you own any physical PET hardware now?

No, all of my work is done using an emulator.


Q. What prompted you to start programming PET games?

To be honest, I was bored. The Commodore 64 has seen every conceivable game out there and I wanted to create something on a platform that was pretty much unsupported. It was a goal I'd had in mind for quite some time because I know PET owners are starved for software. Most of the older software and even the newer is written in BASIC. I wanted to create something enjoyable to play and pure machine language.


Q. How many games have you made so far?

Let's see... Oil's Well and Ladybug. I also did a conversion of Slime from the PET to the Commodore 64. That was something I'd wanted to do for years. Sadly when Slime Deluxe was submitted to to Gamebase they gave the credits to the wrong person.


Q. Which would you say is your best title to date?

Well I'm extremely proud of Slime Deluxe for the C-64. As for the PET, I'd have to say Ladybug. I tried using artificial intelligence to make the enemies chase after you but it didn't quite work out right. If you take a look at Super Glooper for the PET, it was extremely well written. I've tried to find the author without success. The enemies in Super Glooper know to follow you, just like in the real arcade game. I wasn't able to duplicate that logic.


Q. What software and hardware do you use to develop games?

I use PAL Assembler which is one of the most outdated assemblers out there. It was however one of the earliest tools for PET users which is why I use it. I think I'm too old to learn to use anything different.

All programming is done on my Windows 7 laptop using Vice. There are pros and cons to this. The most difficult part is the keyboard emulation. Without a PET keypad (you know, the separate keypad off to the right) it can be a real annoyance playing PET games and play testing my games. This is why in one of my games you could define the keys, so that emulator users wouldn't go crazy. I know that you can define keys, but when it comes to ASCII graphics, without seeing them on the actual keys it can take a lot of trial and error to find the correct keys - for example when I created Ladybug. It was a lot of hunt and peck looking for the right keys to make that maze. The upside is that you've always got a machine language monitor on standby using Vice Emulator and the ability to soft reset. That's the long-winded answer.


Q. What games do you think are best suited to the PET?

We're talking two different eras. The PET was around during the early 1980's which is when Dungeons and Dragons was quite popular. There were several D&D type games created on the PET as well as several text adventures. I think that for the era, those were the games people enjoyed playing. What made the PET so enjoyable was that it used BASIC and anyone could (and did) create software for it. The games weren't necessarily good, some were quite bad, but it brought out the programmer in a lot of teenagers who had access to the PET in the schools.

I think that the all around favourite would be Space Invaders. I don't understand why someone would go through so much effort to create an amazing clone and not give themselves credit.

For the current PET era, I don't have an opinion except to say that they should be in machine language. BASIC games are slow and really not all that exciting compared to machine code games. Look at Scramble, Space Invaders, Super Glooper, Star Spores, Slime and Frogger. You can play those for hours and be entertained, but most of the newer stuff in BASIC you'll grow bored of quickly.


Q. What do you think of the PET emulators now available?

I'm only aware of Vice. I really don't like Vice whatsoever. It's too clunky with too many options and the machine language monitor is ugly to use. If they could have a ML monitor like CCS64 has, it would be much easier to use. I understand Vice is about true emulation so I can't be too critical.


Q. What are your favourite PET games of all time?

Slime and Star Spores. For their time, they remain classics. Challenging, excellent multi-tasking of code and attention to detail. Look at the explosion in Slime and Star Spores, listen to the sound effects. It was all programmed using a monitor which I can't even imagine doing.


Q. Have you played other homebrew available for the PET?

I've looked at most every PET game I could find from the PET Gamebase. To be honest I don't play any of them except for the machine language ones. I look at all of the games (BASIC and machine language) mainly to see who wrote them. I then try to see where they are today and if they remained in programming. It's my inner-geek.


Q. Any plans for more PET games?

You know if I knew as much about programming back in the PET days as I know now, I might have been able to make some good money. There was a market for BASIC games such as adventure and role playing games, not to mention machine language games. I didn't learn machine language until after the PET ship had sailed away and the C64 came along making machine language programmers out of everyone. To answer the question, after many hours of programming for Ladybug and Oil's Well, I asked myself how many people out there were actually going to be seeing these games? Most of the Commodore world has moved on. Whatever stragglers there are left are on the C64, not PET. I know that programming is about enjoyment and having fun, but to me it's like composing a song nobody will hear or writing a book nobody will read - there needs to be an audience. Vinyl records and cassette tapes are making a comeback, so the PET could become popular again - but for now I don't have any plans to work on anything else.

For those that do not know, NOP is actually a command in 65xx machine language. On machines like the PET and C64, it means No OPeration. This is useful for timing, for blank spaces in code and for self-modifying code.
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Re: Issue 168 PET feature - DVD extras

Post by merman » Thu Jun 01, 2017 12:54 pm

Jay Balakrishnan interview:

Q. When did you first get a Commodore PET and how much did you paid for it?

Bought a Commodore PET 2001 with 8K RAM, for $ 800 in April 1978, the first week it was available for sale, at world's first computer store – The Computer Store, in Los Angeles, California. Incidentally, the 4K PET model sold for $600, but I bought the 8K Deluxe model, paying $200 for an extra 4096 bytes of RAM!


Q. Do you still have any PET hardware?

After transitioning to Commodore VIC-20 and then C-64, gave away all PET hardware in mid-1980's, including Commodore 4040 dual 5¼ floppy diskette drives - capacity 170K bytes, which had cost $1000.


Q. What were your earliest computer experiences?

Upon starting University in 1974, my Dad bought for me one of the first 4-function calculators available, for $60 (lot of money back then). That calculator actually started my love for personal electronics. Late in 1974, took my first “Introduction to Computers” class – an IBM 360 mainframe computer with 2MB RAM that ran every system for the University and its 28,000 students.
Few months later in 1975, began Work-Study civilian job at US Navy's Naval Electronics Command. They had acquired a WANG Mini-Computer (size of huge desk, with 32K RAM). None of the engineers knew BASIC - its only programming language - so it literally sat unused, pristine in shrink-wrapped plastic!
Enthusiastic and emboldened by one computer course, my request to use it was authorized. Soon after, with an expensive mini-computer at my sole command, had an experience - like a “religious experience” - that changed my life.
Experimenting one day with user input using BASIC's INPUT statement, suddenly had the intuitive epiphany that a user's input could be processed or modified by this machine and then reflected back to its human user, for further input, in a recursive feedback loop.
Like an electrical shock through my nervous system, instantly realized/appreciated the tremendous power and future potential of all computers. Human tools had always been for the body. Computers were the first tool for the brain – The Hammer of the Mind. From that moment on, my attention, studies & career became dedicated to computers.


Q. How long did it take to understand the PET machine and start programming?

When PET arrived in 1978, there was very little information about PET or personal computers anywhere. Luckily, during the final 3 years at University, developed a huge passion for Computer Languages and learned programming in 20+ languages - PL1, BAL, RPG, LISP, SNOBOL, FORTRAN, BASIC, COBOL, Logo, Pascal, etc. So by the time I got the PET, had learned enough to start programming it from day one.


Q. What prompted you to start work on HesBal – Basic Assembler Language?

An Assembler is a lower level programming language, than compiled higher-level languages like C or C++. Assemblers output the lowest (thus fastest) level of code – Machine Language that microprocessors natively understand.
Had especially liked IBM 360 mainframe's elegant Assembly Language, called BAL (Basic Assembler Language). Thus wanted to learn PET's 6502 Assembly Language - but there wasn't even one 6502 assembler available to buy.
So decided to program in PET BASIC, my own 6502 Assembler (during evening hours, after work), and then send that program to Kilobaud Microcomputing magazine to be published as an educational article... with no thought whatever of selling it.


Q. With a finished program, why did you start selling HesBal commercially?

After graduating from University in December 1977, two months later, got my first real job - at GTE Data Services (giant phone company) as an IBM 360 COBOL programmer. By good fortune, a PET-owning senior programmer named Tom Rugg also worked there. I helped him a little, when he wrote the first book ever for PET - “32 BASIC Programs for the Commodore PET”.
https://archive.org/details/32_BASIC_Pr ... puter_1979
When HesBal neared completion, asked Tom for his professional critique. Unexpectedly, he advised me not to give it away for free, instead that HesBal was good enough to sell commercially. Then I spent few more months to program a needed editor – HesEdit, which became the PET's first full-screen Editor, while HesBal was the world's first 6502 Assembler.
By good fortune, suddenly remembered a forgotten promise made to myself 5 years earlier – that by 25 years of age, I should have my own company. So literally on my 25th birthday, Human Engineered Software (HES - changed to HESWARE in 1983) was officially founded.
HES got started, selling HesBal & HesEdit, together for $16. Kept my full-time day job and worked HES part-time in the evening. In October 1981, with just $2000 in savings, quit my well-paying job, and started working at HES full-time, in my small apartment.


Q. Do you know of any PET games or programs that were created with HESBAL?

In late 1970's, RAM (static) memory was extremely expensive – and limited. PET's operating system “claimed” virtually ALL of its puny 8K bytes, leaving only 192 bytes unallocated in the second cassette buffer. Thus your entire 6502 microprocessor program (output of HesBal assembler) had to fit into just literally 192 bytes!
Needless to say, this extreme memory limitation caused 99% of all PET programs to be written in slow, “interpreted” BASIC language, instead of extremely fast & compact “compiled” 6502 machine code. HesBal was not written as a serious programming production tool. Instead, it was an educational tool, to teach myself and others, the elegant 6502 microprocessor language.

BTW, that's the reason (in Retro Gamer's October 2015 article by Kieren Hawken) I was so impressed by Llamasoft's Jeff Minter and his Defenda VIC-20 game. Starting in 1982, HES licensed all his incredibly fast & smooth games, because they were written 100% in 6502 machine code, not in BASIC.
I did program HesCom (software & hardware communications protocol for a bi-directional data-link cable between VIC-20 & PET) as a hybrid – mostly in BASIC, with a small core of fast/tight 6502 machine code written using HesBal & HesEdit. Thus HesCom was very fast and sold very well.
Also it's likely Terry Peterson used HesBal to create his program, HesMon. HES sold HesMon (low-level programming/debugging tool for Commodore PET & VIC-20), which was used as a programming tool by numerous other programs.


Q. Did HES publish many PET titles?

Only a few, because soon after HES started in 1980, Commodore introduced the VIC-20, to successfully replace the PET. So I transitioned, converting all PET programs (HesBal, HesEdit, HesLister) into VIC-20 and all PET-only development stopped.


Q. What were your favourite PET games?

Before even PET, the first computer game I played, was “Lunar Lander” in 1975. It was a simple BASIC program about ½ page in length, in David Ahl's “Creative Computing” magazine. On the Wang Mini-computer, also played “Star Trek”, programmed in FORTRAN, on punch cards. In 1977, also played the first video game ever - Atari's Pong.
I did enjoy Dave Malmberg's early version of PET Turtle Graphics (based on Seymour Papert's LOGO language).

Don't remember many specific PET games, but Ron Jeffries published “CURSOR” magazine, a Commodore PET monthly “magazine” published on Cassette tapes. Each issue contained about 4 to 8 games & tools for PET. I looked forward each month to getting them – there were some great games, using black & white PET “graphics”.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CURSOR
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8E6pdcv8T6k
http://www.kmoser.com/computerhistory/?id=cursor


Q. Have you seen any of the recent homebrew games for PET?

Not yet.


Q. Looking back, how important was the PET to your business and your career?

The PET was definitely instrumental in increasing my newly-ignited passion/enjoyment of Personal Computers & Software. And the PET set me firmly on the road to entrepreneurship. After starting HES in 1980, I also founded & operated four other startup companies, over the next 13 years.
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Re: Issue 168 PET feature - DVD extras

Post by merman » Thu Jun 01, 2017 12:55 pm

Jason Kelk interview:

Q. Did you own a PET when you were younger?

No, the PET was outside my parents' price range so I started with an
unexpanded VIC 20.


Q. Do you own any physical PET hardware now?

I don't have anything at the moment but, if I can find the space and
disposable income for it, the 4032 is on the list of 8-bit systems I'd
like to own.


Q. What prompted you to start programming PET games?

Mostly that was down to the PET itself; there wasn’t much activity on
the homebrew front at that time, the hardware restrictions looked like
an interesting challenge and having a 6502 processor gave me a head
start.


Q. How many games have you made so far?

Only Blok Copy has been completed and released so far, but there are
bits and pieces for a few more lurking among my workfiles in various
states including a proof of concept full screen hardware scroll
routine that relies on later models of PET.

http://Kikstart.eu/pet-scroll-video


Q. How easy was it to transfer the gameplay of Blok Copy to a monochrome screen?

The original version is unreleased Atari 2600 code where each column
of tiles was a different colour without any other markings, so I
talked Doug “Bizzmo” Roberts into spending some time making distinct
tiles for the PET. It wasn’t easy getting something we were both happy
with, but the final result works far better than my own first
attempts!


Q. What software and hardware do you use to develop games?

Everything I do has been cross assembled for a while now, at the time
Blok Copy was written I was using a Windows XP desktop with Crimson
Editor to write source code and C64Asm to assemble it - now it's a
Windows 7 machine with ACME. I initially tested the code under
emulation and, once most of the game was there, asked PET-owning
friends to give it a try to make sure it would work on different
models of hardware since there’s quite a bit of variation.


Q. What type of games do you think are best suited to the PET?

Generally speaking, pretty much anything the other 8-bit computers can
do should work on the PET with a little redesigning to allow for the
green-on-black character graphics and lack of ways to handle smooth
scrolling. The ZX81 has similar capabilities so something like 3D
Monster Maze would be workable, as would Bob Smith’s scrolling shooter
LumASCII on the Spectrum.


Q. What do you think of the PET emulators now available?

I've only really used VICE but that seems to be pretty solid; the
different models of PET mean that sometimes you need to write
hardware-specific code but everything I've thrown at VICE in that
respect has worked later when tested on real hardware.


Q. What are your favourite PET games of all time?

The one I always end up going back to for a quick blast once in a
while is PET Invaders, I've sunk quite a bit of time into that game
over the years!


Q. Have you played other homebrew available for the PET?

Yes, there are some great homebrew titles out there for the PET and I
spent quite a while playing Lady Bug, Oil's Well and Stairrunner in
particular when they were released, going back to them once in a while
for a couple of quick goes every now and then.


Q. Any plans for more PET games?

I've no plans at the immediate future, but I do have a few work in
progress ideas that will get some attention at some point including a
scrolling shoot 'em up and the port of my puzzle game Reaxion which is
still in the early stages.
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Re: Issue 168 PET feature - DVD extras

Post by merman » Thu Jun 01, 2017 12:58 pm

PET GameBase interview:


JonBos and .Mad. are the team preserving PET games, who wished to be identified by their screen names.
RG: What makes it important to preserve this history?

JonBos: It is the origins of gaming. Programmers had to be passionate to make games on a PET, and astute.

Mad: The old hardware and magnetic media will not last forever.
It also shows just how far computer technology and games have progressed since 1977, when programmers had to make every byte count.


RG: How many games have you preserved?

J: Most of the known ones as only a few are missing. There are also some in German and other languages that were not included as we could not figure them out.

M: The GameBase has 651 entries so far, but there are quite a few non-game programs included. But that's still a high number for a school / business computer.


RG: Is there a “holy grail” to find?

J: Dungeons of Death was the one and Mad found it, which was amazing.

M: The Dragon's Eye by Automated Simulations - Southern Software (Epyx). We have a C64 conversion, thanks to it being written in Commodore BASIC. It's hard to find even photographic proof of the original PET cassette. But the game I would most like to be made for PET is Donkey Kong. I love that game!


RG: What can people do to help?

J: Finding the missing Dunjonquest games would be the best.

M: If they know of any games not listed in the GameBase they used to play or own, please send us the file, cassette or any info they can remember so it can be included in any future version.


RG: What are your favourite PET games of all time?

J: The RPG Telengard, and Car Race by Satoru Iwata (Nintendo CEO, 2002-2015). I think it was one of his first games and it is on a PET! The first game I ran on the emulator was Scramble which remains an all-time favourite of mine.

M: Nightmare Park by Bob Chappell, Space Invaders and Night Race. Just recently I was sent Paladin from Kevin Pickell (ex-EA programmer). Shoot-em-ups don't get any better in 16K.


RG: What do you make of the new homebrew games?

J: It shows the passion in making games and being clever about it. The modern games are breath-taking and show real talent.

For the latest on the PET GameBase, check out this thread at the GameBase forum:

http://www.gb64.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=5383

(GameBase is a frontend designed to launch and run emulators easily, without the player having to configure and change settings. For each format there is a database containing the games, and often with many extras - scans, photos, screenshots and more.)
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DRS
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Re: Issue 168 PET feature - DVD extras

Post by DRS » Fri Jun 02, 2017 8:48 am

*in Ferrero Rocher ad accent* Merman, with these DVD extras, you're really spoiling us...

Cheers mate - I found the article fascinating (brought back lovely memories of playing very primitive arcade clones during wet break times on the single PET we had at school) and these extra bits are a good read too. Ta.

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necronom
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Re: Issue 168 PET feature - DVD extras

Post by necronom » Fri Jun 02, 2017 5:52 pm

Thanks for the extras, and the article. Like Jason, I also want a 4032.

I didn't realise there was a GameBase for the PET. I've tried it and I don't like the orange screenshots. I've never seen a PET with an orange screen, so it looks weird. We had about 7 or 8 at school with about 4 different models and they were either all green or possibly one or two were white text. I can't get the games to run in GB, either. I'll have to ask for help on the GB forum I think.
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Re: Issue 168 PET feature - DVD extras

Post by merman » Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:18 am

necronom wrote:
Fri Jun 02, 2017 5:52 pm
Thanks for the extras, and the article. Like Jason, I also want a 4032.

I didn't realise there was a GameBase for the PET. I've tried it and I don't like the orange screenshots. I've never seen a PET with an orange screen, so it looks weird. We had about 7 or 8 at school with about 4 different models and they were either all green or possibly one or two were white text. I can't get the games to run in GB, either. I'll have to ask for help on the GB forum I think.
In VICE, go into Settings > Video Settings

There's a drop-down menu where you can choose amber, green etc.
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necronom
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Re: Issue 168 PET feature - DVD extras

Post by necronom » Sat Jun 03, 2017 5:32 pm

merman wrote:
Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:18 am
necronom wrote:
Fri Jun 02, 2017 5:52 pm
Thanks for the extras, and the article. Like Jason, I also want a 4032.

I didn't realise there was a GameBase for the PET. I've tried it and I don't like the orange screenshots. I've never seen a PET with an orange screen, so it looks weird. We had about 7 or 8 at school with about 4 different models and they were either all green or possibly one or two were white text. I can't get the games to run in GB, either. I'll have to ask for help on the GB forum I think.
In VICE, go into Settings > Video Settings

There's a drop-down menu where you can choose amber, green etc.
It was the Gamebase pics and general amber-ness I didn't like. I can change how the games look in VICE, though I haven't found how to get it to default to green from being run from GB yet.

I managed to get the games to play properly. Something to do with the GEMUS Script files. GB also had the German version of Nightmare Park, so I changed that for the British one. I used to play that at school, and ended up making my own on the the Amiga and possibly the C64 or Vic-20. I think our computer teacher did a version on the C64 or Vic, too.
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