From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

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kelp7
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by kelp7 » Thu Apr 04, 2013 6:31 am

I think the adventure game that I have played more times than most would be Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy, it's the first one that really drew me in when I was very young, I guess being a fan of the material already helped but the puzzles were excellent and you felt you achieved a lot when you solved them. That Babel Fish puzzle will never be forgotten here!
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AmigaJay
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by AmigaJay » Thu Apr 04, 2013 6:40 pm

Lure of the temptress in the Amiga, amazing adventure, really made you feel you were a part of the story, and the first adventure to have characters go about their daily business even if you weren't on the same screen.

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Cafeman
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by Cafeman » Fri Apr 05, 2013 12:18 pm

My fave would have to be either Tomb Raider on Saturn/PS, or Flashback: Quest for Identity, on SEGA Genesis. Concerning Flasbhack, I loved the sci-fi worlds and storyline. The graphics and animation were fantastic. I liked the pacing of the game overall.

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pforson
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by pforson » Sat Apr 06, 2013 8:49 am

Beneath a Steel Sky (Amiga / PC).

The introduction is cool, the music imposing and the artwork, created by acclaimed comic book artist Dave Gibbons, is stunning. It's a British made science fiction point and click adventure set in a post apocalyptic setting. All told, what's not to like about Beneath a Steel Sky?

This is one of my all time favourite games on any format. It proved that the Americans (LucasArts) were not the only ones capable of crafting a great adventure.

The game is set in a future Australia and you take control of Robert Foster, a man who survived a plane crash, grew up in the gap (the Australian outback) and who is named after a beer. An evil computer that runs Union City named LINC sends some agents out into the wilderness to bring you back to the city, but as you are being transported the helicopter crashes and you find yourself in Union City with no ID and no hope, all you have is your pet robot named Joey.

Despite its dark setting this game is classic British farce and oozes grace. The dialogue is witty and the story compelling. If I could pay someone to erase the game from my mind, I would do it just to experience it for the first time all over again!

Please Revolution, make a sequel.

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AmigaJay
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by AmigaJay » Sat Apr 06, 2013 5:40 pm

pforson wrote:Beneath a Steel Sky (Amiga / PC).

The introduction is cool, the music imposing and the artwork, created by acclaimed comic book artist Dave Gibbons, is stunning. It's a British made science fiction point and click adventure set in a post apocalyptic setting. All told, what's not to like about Beneath a Steel Sky?

This is one of my all time favourite games on any format. It proved that the Americans (LucasArts) were not the only ones capable of crafting a great adventure.

The game is set in a future Australia and you take control of Robert Foster, a man who survived a plane crash, grew up in the gap (the Australian outback) and who is named after a beer. An evil computer that runs Union City named LINC sends some agents out into the wilderness to bring you back to the city, but as you are being transported the helicopter crashes and you find yourself in Union City with no ID and no hope, all you have is your pet robot named Joey.

Despite its dark setting this game is classic British farce and oozes grace. The dialogue is witty and the story compelling. If I could pay someone to erase the game from my mind, I would do it just to experience it for the first time all over again!

Please Revolution, make a sequel.

Be vigilant.
They are! Dev begins after latest Broken Sword completed!

antsbull
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by antsbull » Sun Apr 07, 2013 12:32 am

Cafeman wrote:My fave would have to be either Tomb Raider on Saturn/PS, or Flashback: Quest for Identity, on SEGA Genesis. Concerning Flasbhack, I loved the sci-fi worlds and storyline. The graphics and animation were fantastic. I liked the pacing of the game overall.
I'm not wanting to start an argument, but aren't those action-adventure games? I was of the impression this was about Graphic Adventures and Interactive Fiction games?

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ChoroQ
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by ChoroQ » Mon Apr 08, 2013 8:16 am

Noctropolis seems totally forgotten now and was very underrated in 1994. It was my first point and click adventure on this new thing called cd-rom. Noctropolis features real actors in a dark comic book world. It has some great villains, the first one you encounter is a Succubus! If I have a nightmare it better be this one.

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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by LAIS » Tue Apr 09, 2013 3:27 am

The Walking Dead is a fantastic modern adventure game. It's much better than the rather irritating TV show and creates characters you genuinely care about. Lee is a fantastic, relatable protagonist and Clementine was written for perfectly. Done badly she could have been an irritating extra, but you genuinely feel you want to look after her. Plus, if anyone can watch that ending sequence without shedding a tear then they really do have a heart of stone. Incredible writing.

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Cafeman
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by Cafeman » Tue Apr 09, 2013 8:25 pm

antsbull wrote:
Cafeman wrote:My fave would have to be either Tomb Raider on Saturn/PS, or Flashback: Quest for Identity, on SEGA Genesis. Concerning Flasbhack, I loved the sci-fi worlds and storyline. The graphics and animation were fantastic. I liked the pacing of the game overall.
I'm not wanting to start an argument, but aren't those action-adventure games? I was of the impression this was about Graphic Adventures and Interactive Fiction games?
Well, I'm American and it wouldn't be the first time I didn't quite get the subject. The 1st post just said Adventure game. Maybe I've never actually played an Adventure game, if that's what is meant - I've only played "Action-Adventure games". I never played any of the games you all are listing. Is Sega CD Snatcher what you are talking about ? IF so, I vote for that.

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hydr0x
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by hydr0x » Thu Apr 11, 2013 4:12 am

Has nothing to do with being American, adventure games and action-adventure games have the same meaning over there.
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antsbull
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by antsbull » Thu Apr 11, 2013 9:44 am

Adventure games were invented in the US, and were the market leaders in game sales there for almost a decade from the mid-80s through to the mid 90s - Kings Quest, Leisure Suit Larry, Zork, The Secret of Monkey Island, Maniac Mansion etc. In particular, Sierra Online at their peak, had 32% of all computer game sales in the country, of which 99% were adventure game sales.

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fulgenzio
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by fulgenzio » Thu Apr 11, 2013 6:41 pm

Day of the Tentacle, and The Dig, one of the most underrated adventure ever.

fahrenheit1987
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by fahrenheit1987 » Sun Apr 14, 2013 2:51 pm

I really loved the games of Pete Torrance. Particularly, Subsunk, Seabase Delta and Imagination. They were eminently solvable either through being puzzles that made sense, or puzzles that had clues in the form of word-play. But I also have an incredibly soft spot for Emerald Isle by Level 9, because I won it in a competition from SInclair Programs (a month after I won 'Backpackers Guide to the Universe' - I think their circulation must have been very small at this point)

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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by GarryG » Mon Apr 15, 2013 4:19 pm

'Adventure Games' will always be old-school text-only to me, and my definative one has to be Adventureland by Scott Adams. It's everything a text adventure should be, and it was the first adventure game I ever played on my brand new VIC-20.
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The Beans
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by The Beans » Mon Apr 15, 2013 4:42 pm

GarryG wrote:'Adventure Games' will always mean old-school text-only to me, and my definative one has to be Adventureland by Scott Adams. It's everything a text adventure should be, and it was the first adventure game I ever played on my brand new VIC-20.
Classic stuff.
I too first cut my adventuring teeth on a Scott Adams game but it was Voodoo Castle on my school's TRS80. The second game I ever played was Zork, also on the school's TRS80.
The first adventure game I bought to play at home was Espionage Island for the ZX Spectrum.
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