From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

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Stuart@retrogamer
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From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by Stuart@retrogamer » Thu Mar 28, 2013 10:30 am

For the letters pages this month we would like to know what's your favourite adventure game and why?

kleinemaus
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by kleinemaus » Thu Mar 28, 2013 10:53 am

Starcross (Infocom) on A8, I saw this flying saucer box in a computer shop, I thought 'wow what a great packing'. Playing the game was reading like an adventure book, a fascinating experience. After Starcross I was hooked and I enjoyed the excellent games from Infocom on A8 and C64. Best ever.

The Pawn....very British, lots of humour (listen to the wall), marvelous.

And Level 9, the first female adventure game hero, Kim Kimberly in Snowball on A8 too. Level 9 rocked.

Rick Hanson from UKs Robico Software on A8 was a very good game too.

Later of course, Maniac Mansion on C64, Zak McKraken on C64, loved both.

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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by Hiro » Thu Mar 28, 2013 11:46 am

Zak McKracken and the Alien Mindbenders is the first mouse driven adventure I played and one of the first games I loaded on my Amiga, and deserves the top spot. Brilliant puzzles, a lot of locations, great humour. Stellar game.

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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by ncf1 » Thu Mar 28, 2013 1:14 pm

Oh boy. Of the countless adventures I've played and beaten, it boils down to two : Monkey Island 2 and The Dark Eye. I will lean towards the latter in this instance simply because of its originality; there was nothing quite like it at the time and there still isn't. Amazing stop-motion puppetry visuals, dark and twisted storylines, a truly terrifying and absorbing, original game, and if it didnt crash on newer systems I'd still be playing it today.

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joefish
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by joefish » Thu Mar 28, 2013 1:44 pm

kleinemaus wrote:And Level 9, the first female adventure game hero, Kim Kimberly in Snowball on A8 too. Level 9 rocked.
I seem to recall the intention there was to make the character's gender ambiguous, on the grounds that 'Kim' could be a male or female name. Though personally I'd agree I only knew it as a girl's name - any reference to it as a boy's name seems long in the past.

Of text adventures, the one I spent most time with was Rigel's Revenge on the Spectrum. That had a neat trick of giving you pages of text to read as it loaded, and you wouldn't get anywhere if you hadn't read them carefully.

Later on it would have to be Riven (Myst II) for its sumptous graphics. I think I played in on a PC, though I now have the PlayStation version. It really gave the impression of another world, and a pretty one at that. The adventuring and video sequences were amazing. I'll admit I needed a few hints to complete it, but at least it didn't involve the note-taking and cross-referencing puzzles to the extent the original did.

Myst III: Exile (XBox) looked even better, using panoramic views with inset video. But it did feel a bit linear - much less opportunity to explore as you chase the bad guy from one tiny island to another. I've got the fourth one but it doesn't seem that interesting. From what I've seen, the later free-roaming ones didn't capture the charm of the early games either. I should probably give the first one a proper try to completion, though maybe the free-roaming Real Myst version.

I did have some fun building a set of Myst-style puzzles on my own zone in LEGO Universe - won a prize for it even - but sadly that game closed down. And the acclaim only served to highlight a load of lag-related bugs in the game scripting engine when more than a couple of players turned up at the same time.

I think the best thing about Riven and Exile (Myst II and III) is then taking a holiday to the smaller Greek islands, wandering off the popular routes, and finding coves and islands and villages dug into cliffs or abandoned temples, bright green lizards and huge shimmering bugs, all in peaceful and glorious sunshine, but for real. [Note: Wear any stout hiking footwear on the flight so it doesn't count as luggage weight; take plenty of water; and try to remember you only have one life so don't fall off high things and die just to see what happens. And always, always, remember where your towel is].

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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by gman72 » Thu Mar 28, 2013 2:50 pm

Dreamfall The Longest Journey is a wonderful XBOX adventure game.
“To gain your own voice, you have to forget about having it heard.” —Allen Ginsberg, WD

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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by kiwimike » Thu Mar 28, 2013 4:29 pm

The ones I remember most fondly would be Transylvania and Zork, which would be the first ones I played on the schools Apple II.

Adventure games are a wide genre though- It depends on if we're talking text and text/graphic, point n clicks, slideshow myst styles...games like Flashback might be pushing it lol but I like to add flashback to most lists :wink:

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PanzerGeneral
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by PanzerGeneral » Thu Mar 28, 2013 4:50 pm

Level 9 were the kings for me, never really got the same feeling for Infocom and the others. Return to Eden and Red Moon were my favourites. Anybody who says they finished Return to Eden without the clue sheet - either designed the game - or, was a lying bastard.

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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by Garry » Thu Mar 28, 2013 5:52 pm

The first two broken swords for me, really held your attention throughout and the puzzles were never too fiendish
back further and text adventures, i would have to give a shout out to Infocom games Deadline and Bureaucracy, hours of entertainment there
infocom were the masters of these types of games, it was amazing how lines of text or a simple picture or insert in the box could set your imagination racing
i must have played so many of these types of games on the c64 and it is one genre that is really missed (when done right of course!)
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retrojc
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by retrojc » Thu Mar 28, 2013 5:54 pm

Does Fallout 3 count? That was certainly an adventure.

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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by HalcyonDaze00 » Thu Mar 28, 2013 5:54 pm

The magnificent Monkey Island 1 & 2 are way ahead of everything else.

Aside from these two legendary games I will always have a soft spot for Urban Upstart on the Speccy, we had a primary school teacher who would let us leave lessons to play it!!

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Hiro
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by Hiro » Thu Mar 28, 2013 5:55 pm

Thinking about text adventures, some by CRL were excellent, with a superb atmosphere... the ones with the text written by Rod Pike. Jack the Ripper in particular is an incredible journey.

What about tracking down this Rod Pike guy, RG staff? :o
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Garry
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by Garry » Thu Mar 28, 2013 6:00 pm

Hiro wrote:Thinking about text adventures, some by CRL were excellent, with a superb atmosphere... the ones with the text written by Rod Pike. Jack the Ripper in particular is an incredible journey.

What about tracking down this Rod Pike guy, RG staff? :o
great shout Hiro, and wasnt Jack the Ripper so gory it was one of the first '18 and over' games released? i know that makes the game instantly better in the eyes of a young games player! well it did in my case!!
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Hiro
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by Hiro » Thu Mar 28, 2013 6:07 pm

Garry wrote:great shout Hiro, and wasnt Jack the Ripper so gory it was one of the first '18 and over' games released? i know that makes the game instantly better in the eyes of a young games player! well it did in my case!!
As far as I remember, before JtR, Dracula (released the year before) already made a big uproar and was maybe the first game (surely one of the first) to pave the way for age limitations for videogames :)
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Re: From the forum issue 115 - Adventure games

Post by Mire Mare » Thu Mar 28, 2013 6:33 pm

In Infocom's Suspended you're in suspended animation, hardwired to a planetary system that's started to go wrong. It's frantic, fun and the only game I can think that I ever played where the main protagonist never moves!

This is probably the first adventure I sought out and bought because of the storyline and the promise of glossy packing, maps and all. I wasn't disappointed and I still play Suspended on my C64. It's one of those games I'll always keep.

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