Have any of you heard of Acorn etc.

Want to air your opinions on the latest issue of Retro Gamer? Step inside...

Moderators: mknott, NickThorpe, lcarlson, Darran@Retro Gamer, MMohammed

Locked
sjstimer
Posts: 24
Joined: Fri Dec 16, 2005 2:17 pm

Have any of you heard of Acorn etc.

Post by sjstimer » Thu Jan 12, 2006 12:24 pm

Because if issue 19 and issue 20 are anything to go by Acorn must have been a frigment of my imagination and didnt exist.

Dont get me wrong I love the new retro gamer magazine but retro must not mean some systems and not others.

In the charts section we have C64, Spectrum and AmstradCpc and thats it. If only these computers existed in the eighties then there would not have been a lot of choice but lots more did especially ACCCCCOOOOOORRRRNNN computers like BBC,A,B, Atom, Archimedes, Acorn Electron, BBC Master etc.

So why is there no mention of these, then I come here to the forum and see someone has done a poll on the favorite computer of all time and guess what the poll is C64, Spectrum, AmstradCPC ARRRRGGGGGHHHHHHHH.

All im saying is maybe retro gamer could vary the charts and have charts of different systems every month instead of the same 3, or if that is to much trouble for them maybe they could have the 1st two systems as standard e.g. c64 and spectrum and vary just the the third one acorn one month then atari the next month etc, so there would be some variety.

At least then we would have charts on other system too.

User avatar
LeeT
Posts: 1061
Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:36 pm

Post by LeeT » Thu Jan 12, 2006 1:31 pm

The charts cover the main three formats of that time (Spectrum, C64 and CPC). If you had the BBC, then what about MSX, Dragon32 etc?

Regarding content, it would be nice to see the BBC as the featured hardware one month (with the best games).

sjstimer
Posts: 24
Joined: Fri Dec 16, 2005 2:17 pm

re:

Post by sjstimer » Thu Jan 12, 2006 1:58 pm

Your not getting what im saying.

There are many different formats, instead of having the same 3 main formats every month how about varying them thats all or just have 2 main one e.g. c64 and spectrum and putting a different third one every month that would make sure that everybodys happy as some time or other their favorite would be in the charts

who says that c64, spectrum, amstrad were the main ones anyway. You a bit narrow minded if you think that. In wales the dragon 32/64 was the main format in some places the msx was the main format and as retro gamer is a global magazine with regular readers as far away as USA and Austrailia it would be fair on everyone to have some different charts now and again ok.

I think that varying the third colum in the charts would be a good idea or even keeping the 3 'main' ones as you call them and add a fourth format which would be varied every month.

User avatar
LeeT
Posts: 1061
Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:36 pm

Re: re:

Post by LeeT » Thu Jan 12, 2006 2:03 pm

sjstimer wrote: who says that c64, spectrum, amstrad were the main ones anyway. You a bit narrow minded if you think that. In wales the dragon 32/64 was the main format in some places the msx was the main format and as retro gamer is a global magazine with regular readers as far away as USA and Austrailia it would be fair on everyone to have some different charts now and again ok.
I think its generally recognised by most people that those were the three main formats. I do emulate the BBC (and indeed own one with some games) but you have to accept that it wasn't as popular as the Speccy, C64 or Amstrad CPC.

bounty bob
Posts: 173
Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 9:03 pm
Location: Caverns Of Mars

Post by bounty bob » Thu Jan 12, 2006 4:54 pm

I would agree with sjstimer. Retro Gamer magazine is a global magazine, readers in USA, Australia etc. This is the same argument that I was having 20 years ago with C64 owners in school. In my class only 6 of us had a computer, 2 had C64, 2 had Atari xl, 1 had amstrad, the other an acorn. C64/Amstrad/Speccy owners want to re-write history to show that there computers were the most popular and best, and the rest didn't exist because they only sold 1 or 2 machines total. Well thats just not true.

In my opinion, Other machines were more popular in some parts of the world than your top 3 (who in the States had hered of Amstrad back in the early eighties... no-one). Games on these machines were just as good if not better than some on your charts and it would be nice to have a variety. It may just have been harder to get games for our machines, and maybe we didn't have the same marketing suport. But check the net out, other machines are popular and just as popular as your top 3. It would be nice to see a mixture of charts, a mixture of screen shots, a mixture of reviews. Not Narromindedness, thats not what retro gamer was about or is about (hopefully). I do hope that Retrogamer just doesn't turn into Zap or Crash. Why do you think it sold so much and was lives' biggest seller because it was fair and had fair coverage, it didn't say who was more popular, it didn't say who was the best, and it appealed to all retro gamers alike.
Atari 800XL thrashes the C64 every time!!!
(well, nearly everytime)
(OK, some of the time)

User avatar
Dudley
Posts: 8705
Joined: Sat Dec 10, 2005 7:53 pm
Contact:

Re:

Post by Dudley » Thu Jan 12, 2006 5:21 pm

bounty bob wrote:I would agree with sjstimer. Retro Gamer magazine is a global magazine,
No it isn't. It's a british magazine that other people happen to buy. It's therefore going to concentrate on what the brits are interested in.

Retro gamer is avaliable for international licencing. Maybe you should talk to your local publishing companies.
Yesterzine - The Literal Magazine Show
http://yesterzine.co.uk | @Yesterzine on Twitter | yesterzineshow@gmail.com

User avatar
Sparrowhawk
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2006 3:52 am

Re:

Post by Sparrowhawk » Thu Jan 12, 2006 5:50 pm

bounty bob wrote:C64/Amstrad/Speccy owners want to re-write history to show that there computers were the most popular and best, and the rest didn't exist because they only sold 1 or 2 machines total. Well thats just not true.
That's rather a generalisation. I don't recall ever saying such a thing, nor most other Speccy (or C64) owners on this board. Or indeed Amstrad owners.

But for what it's worth, as a UK magazine I think that RG *should* include the BBC since most schools standardised on this, and thus for many of us the Beeb was indeed out first experience of computing.

The others, such as Dragon, Atari 400/800/XE/XL etc, MSX, Oric, QL (my fave) etc were minority machines, but none the worse for it.

There's nothing stopping you starting up a poll of your own - the option is there at the bottom of the page when you create a post. Give it a go, I for one would like a broader choice.

User avatar
thr0b
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Dec 02, 2005 7:01 pm
Contact:

Post by thr0b » Thu Jan 12, 2006 6:00 pm

The BBC is an interesting case though, isn't it? Simply because most of us know them as a school computer, it's not really thought of as a games machine. That's not to say it didn't have games - we know it did. But as fewer people ever played them in the first place, there's potentially less scope for interesting articles on them.

Saying that, the reverse could equally be true. But those articles would be best written by people who actually played the games.

And the BBC had the best version of Chuckie Egg.

User avatar
Ritchardo mkII
Posts: 107
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2005 4:00 pm

Post by Ritchardo mkII » Thu Jan 12, 2006 8:48 pm

This is getting ridiculous.

I'm a regular member of an Amstrad CPC forum and every know and again it gets a little 'chips on shoulder' over there at the idea of Spectrum and C64 owners re-writing history to exclude the CPC from 8-bit computing history. It's absolute nonsense and will invariably spark a 10 or 11 page thread on someone else's forum as some of the more firebrand members invade and have a rant.

My point: Without question the most popular British 8-bit machine was the Spectrum, followed by the Commodore and thirded by the Amstrad. Spectrum had mass market appeal to games publishers, the C64 also had a large base and the possibility (however remote) of punting the game overseas, the Amstrad took off in the continent in a big way and was relatively close enough to the Speccy to make quick ports a simple process.

It was economically more viable to concentrate on those machines so most publishers did so. No-one is saying that other game formats didn't exist but the majority languish somewhere distant behind the CPC which was itself a clear third.

For Retro Gamer to reach it's target market - a percentage of ALL former 8-bit computer owners - it has to tailor it's approach to reflect the same sales slant as the games publishers. The higher the core base, the better the chance of sales. They're not going to leave anyone in the cold completely but they do have to focus their attention on what the masses want. I don't think it's too big a stretch of the imagination to say that the Spectrum owners would constitute the biggest readership group of Retro Gamers and so on.

For what it's worth I'd love some more CPC content but I know that it will come in future issues and we've already had a company profile on Amsoft - which certainly filled a gap.

I'm sure the Acorn range will be covered at some point and I for one will find it an interesting read.

You can't please all of the people, all of the time.
Am I Not online? Try: www.cpczone.net

User avatar
LeeT
Posts: 1061
Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:36 pm

Post by LeeT » Thu Jan 12, 2006 10:36 pm

Well said! :)

User avatar
Sureshot
Posts: 5029
Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2005 2:52 pm
Location: Mids., UK

Post by Sureshot » Thu Jan 12, 2006 10:42 pm

I agree that there should be more Acorn stuff. I'm pretty bored of any mention of Acorn being comprised of 'Elite' and/or 'Educational' - I realise these were a couple of major points for the BBC, but they have been covered ad nauseum by now.

What about Superior (who published Exile, by the way) and the PIAS series? Dig further, and you'll find there were a LOT of games created for the BBC & Electron. Just take a look at Stairwaytohell if you want some proof.

User avatar
CraigGrannell
Posts: 4734
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 6:15 am
Contact:

Post by CraigGrannell » Fri Jan 13, 2006 3:48 am

Maybe Acorn/BBC users who are up in arms about this should list games from those systems that they think should be covered in Retro Gamer (and that aren't merely conversions from other platforms).

With regards to the charts, I imagine the three formats currently listed were chosen because those were the systems with the highest sales AND most games, thereby making the charts change frequently. Assuming this series continues ad infinitum, I suspect the platforms will gradually change, as the market does. (After all, if the series reaches, say, 1993, there'd be little point in listing a chart of C64 budget rereleases when there'd be platforms where new games were selling.)

The history page also has a sidebar looking at magazines of old, and I suspect accessibility has something to do with the ones chosen. Scans of all of the old Newsfield mags are available, but is that the case with BBC magazines?
iPhone/iPod/iPad game/app reviews: http://www.iphonetiny.com

User avatar
Randall Flagg
Posts: 1898
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2005 7:21 am
Location: The Underwurlde
Contact:

Re: re:

Post by Randall Flagg » Fri Jan 13, 2006 4:32 am

LeeT wrote: I think its generally recognised by most people that those were the three main formats. I do emulate the BBC (and indeed own one with some games) but you have to accept that it wasn't as popular as the Speccy, C64 or Amstrad CPC.
Thats just complete crap. There were far more BBC and Electron users than there were Amstrad CPC users at my school. To compare BBC/ electron users to Dragon 32 or MSX users is completely ridiculous.

In fact I'm pretty sure that in my year at school bbc owners may have even out numbered C64 owners. I only ever remember two of my mates having one. Yes, the speccy was number one for numbers.

I still to this day, only know one person who owned a Dragon 32, likewise with an MSX so to compare the BBC Micro to that is unbelievable.

The BBC and Electron, as well as having great arcade conversions and the cream of other platforms software converted to it had loads of its own games as well. To think of this as an educational machine is just so narrow minded and typically bias. What this would appear to basically come down to is that the RG staff were all Speccy / C64 / Amstrad owners and therefore in their opinion no other computer warrants regular coverage.
Retrotechy.
Zapp Brannigan Quote - You remind me of a younger me Fry, Not much younger mind, Perhaps even a little older... Image

User avatar
Mayhem
Posts: 4741
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2005 7:05 pm
Location: London
Contact:

Post by Mayhem » Fri Jan 13, 2006 5:18 am

And to contrast here, whilst at school, I knew one person with a BBC. He was also a bit of a techy geezer so we were always asking him how to do various stuff in our computer classes.

Over that, I knew a few people with a Speccy, one with an Amstrad, and a lot with C64s. Probably more than the rest combined. But that's just my school now. One example does not a rule make ;)

Anyhow, I played a lot of BBC games at school during the mid to late 80s so I know what the machine is capable of. I'm sure some of us are able to write about the machine in the future... question is whether that gets the good ahead to be done :)
Lie with passion and be forever damned...

Image

User avatar
Randall Flagg
Posts: 1898
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2005 7:21 am
Location: The Underwurlde
Contact:

Re:

Post by Randall Flagg » Fri Jan 13, 2006 5:28 am

Mayhem wrote:And to contrast here, whilst at school, I knew one person with a BBC. He was also a bit of a techy geezer so we were always asking him how to do various stuff in our computer classes.

Over that, I knew a few people with a Speccy, one with an Amstrad, and a lot with C64s. Probably more than the rest combined. But that's just my school now. One example does not a rule make ;)

Anyhow, I played a lot of BBC games at school during the mid to late 80s so I know what the machine is capable of. I'm sure some of us are able to write about the machine in the future... question is whether that gets the good ahead to be done :)
Absolutely, I think that you've illustrated my point perfectly. I certainly dont think that all schools were like my school Computer ratio wise, It depends on what specific years you were at school as well as 100 other factors. In addion to this there is also the other generations who were using home computers.

While I was at school in early 80's, my brother who was early 30's at time already had a BBC B and so did most of his workmates, they considered the BBC a more adult platform to use (ha ha, didn't stop him playing games on it constantly though). I looked at my mates spectrum, his BBC B and decided I wanted a BBC. Like I said C64s seemed to be rare down our way and I never got to see one until later.

It would appear though that the retrogamer staff have assumed that their school experience of Spectrum,C64,Amstrad as top dogs is being pushed as the unbreakable rule and therefore what the whole country was experiencing and it just ain't true.
Retrotechy.
Zapp Brannigan Quote - You remind me of a younger me Fry, Not much younger mind, Perhaps even a little older... Image

Locked

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests